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Full text of "The Stagecoach"

(928 



Copyright 1928 
Pattie Sherwood Smith 
Mary Katherine Duff 




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Volume X#K 

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•Rnkigt), Jlotti) Carolina 




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Bcbtcation 

T3 ECAUSE we respect and admire her for her earnest 
endeavour to inculcate in the minds of the girls 
entrusted to her charge the highest ideals of Christian 
life, straightforward thinking and Southern woman- 
hood, we, the Class of 1928, affectionately dedicate 
this our yearbook to 

MISS CATHERINE SETON ALBERTS* ).\. 




3fn Jflemoriam 



Vyil.LIAM ENOS STONE was born on February 16, 1859, in 
Boston, Massachusetts. After a liberal education in 
Europe Ire entered Harvard University, front which he graduated 
in 1882. On coming to the South, he engaged in business for a 
time in Greensboro. It was there he married Miss Sue Dick, 
daughter of Judge and Mrs. Robert P. Dick. In succession he 
held the position of head-master at Edenton Academy and of 
teacher at Porter Academy in Charleston. From 1905 until his 
death he taught in Saint Mary's School, instructing many of the 
girls of this State in French, English and Latin; more recently 
he taught History, Economics and Sociology. His loyal support 
was given in every phase of school life — religious, social, athletic. 
On January 14, 1928, he died after a week's illness. 

Those who have known him and loved him know the emptv 
place his going has left. The girls of the school delighted to see 
him about the campus, on Sunday walks, in the chapel; delighted 
in paying him ever} 1 little courtesy and mark of respect in their 
power whether he taught them or not. 

The class of 1928 feels that there is no adequate way to express 
their feeling that can show the love and reverence thev had for 
their gentle teacher, whose last classes thev attended. 




Contents! 



I. THE SCHOOL 

II. THE CLASSES 

1. Senior 

2. Junior 

3. Sophomore 

4. Freshman 

5. Prep 

III. ACTIVITIES 

1. Organizations 

2. Literary Societies 

3. Clubs 

4. Athletics 

VI. ODDS AND THE END 

1. Statistics 

2. Humor 




3MSCME 




<v 



***** dUj**»^ 

^ ^ G ** A ^*-H ^*L ^ OLi 




Nine 



&lma jHater 

Tune: "Believe Me, If All Those Endearing Young Charms'' 

OT. MARY'S! wherever thy daughters may be 

^-* They love thy high praises to sing, 

And tell of thy beauties of campus and tree 

Around which sweet memories cling; 

They may wander afar; out of reach of thy name, 

Afar out of sight of thy grove, 

But the thought of Saint Mary's aye kindles a flame 

Of sweet recollections and love. 

Beloved Saint Mary's! How great is our debt! 

Thou hast cared for thy daughters full well; 

They can never thy happy instructions forget. 

Nor fail of thy virtues to tell. 

The love that they feel is a heritage pure; 

An experience wholesome and sweet. 

Through fast rolling years it will grow and endure 

Be a lamp and a guide to their feet. 

May the future unite all the good of the past 
With the best that new knowledge can bring. 
Ever onward and upward tin- course! to the last 
Be thou steadfast in every good thing. 
Generations to come may thy fair daughters si ill 
Fondly think on thy halls and thy grove. 
And carry thy teachings o'er woodland and hill. 
( )t earnestness, wisdom and love. 



mi, 




Eleven 




Twelve 




Thirteen 



• 1 

P m 






& if- 


i 

1 VI 




^ 


^^"" — v*^hH ~.~-i"" i .".""ST;. • ^^^ , .^. 


i ' 1 








[7 



Fourteen 




Fifteen 




Sixteen 



poarti of ^rusftees; 



Cfje Jtofiops 

Rt. Rev. Jos. Blount Cheshire, D.D Raleigh, N. C. 

Rt. Rev. Wm. Alexander Guerry, D.D Charleston, S. C. 

Rt. Rev. Junius M. Horner, D.D Asheville, N. C. 

Rt. Rev. Thos. C. Darst, D.D Wilmington, N. C. 

Rt. Rev. Kirkman G. Finlay, D.D Columbia, S. C. 

Rt. Rev. Edwin A. Penick, D.D., Chairman Charlotte, N. C. 



Clerical attb Hap trustees 

North Carolina 
(Until 1930) (Until 1927) 

Mr. Graham H. Andrews, Raleigh Rev. M. A. Barber, Raleigh 

Mr. Thos. H. Battle, Rocky Mount Mrs. T. W. Bickett, Raleigh 

Mr. W. A. Erwin, Durham 
Mrs. W. D. Toy, Chapel Hill Rev. Issac W. Hughes, Henderson 



(Until 1930) 
Rev. J. B. Gibble, Wilmington 
Mr. Geo. C Royall, Goldsboro 



East Carolina 

(Until 1927) 
Rev. R. B. Drane, D.D., Edenton 
Mr. W. D. MacMillan, Jr., Wilmington 



Western North Carolina 
(Until 192S) (Until 1927) 

Rev. J. W. Cantey Johnson, Gastonia Rev. John H. Griffith, Lenoir 

Mr. Geo. H. Holmes, Tryon Mr. Addison C. Mangum, Gastonia 



(Until 1929) 

Mr. T. W. Bacot, Charleston 
Dr. Wm. Egleston, Hartsville 



(Until 1927) 
Mr. G. H. Green, Rock Hill 
Mr. W. S. Manning, Spartanburg 



South Carolina 

(Until 1929) 
Rev. W. S. Povner, Florence 
Rev. Wm. Way, D.D., Charleston 

Upper South Carolina 

(Until 1927) 
Rev. Malcolm S. Taylor, Greenville 
Rev. T. T. Walsh, York 



Mr. Graham H. Andrews 
Mrs. T. W. Bickett 
Mr. W. A. Erwin 



Cxeeutitoe Committee 

Rt. Rev. Jos. Blount Cheshire, D.D., Chairman 



Rev. Issac W. Hughes 
Mr. Geo. C. Royall 



ipecrctarp of tfjc ISoaro of QCruartees 

Mr. Al. Purrinctox, Jr., Raleigh, N. C. 

treasurer of tfjc JSoarb of QTrueftectf 

Mr. A. W. Tucker, Raleigh, N. C. 



Seventeen 




The Rt. Rev. Joseph Blount Cheshire 
Bishop of The Diocese of North Carolina 



Eighteen 



i § 

ml #1 


j 




^L * /* ^^B 


^ 


* 




c 1 




1 v 


■ 





The Rt, Rev. Edwin A. Penick 
Chairman of The Board of Trustees 



Nineteen 




The Rev. Warren Wade Way 
Rector of St. Mary's School 



Twenty 




Miss Catherine Seton Albertson 
Dean of Students 



Twenty-one 




Miss Virginia Henry Holt 
Academic Head 



Twenty-two 




Mr. Albert William Tucker 
Business Manager 



Twenty-three 




Miss Katie McKimmon 

"Constant as the Northern Star, 

Of whose true, fix'd, and resting quality 

There is no fellow in the firmament.' 



— Emilie McVea. 



Twenty-four 








NPEfc 



-.- _ 



Faculty Snapshots 



Twenty-five 



®f)e tfatultp attb Officers; of &aint Mavfsi 

1927=1928 

Rev. Warren W. Way 

Miss Catherine Seton Ai.bertson —- — .—-Rector 

Miss Virginia Henry Holt " D '"" ° S,ud "" s 

\ W. Tucker ". Academic Head 

Secretary and Business Manager 

Wt)t SJcabemtc Bepartment 

Rev. Warren W. Way 

..Bible 

A. B„ Flobnrl College; A.M., University of Chicago; Rector of Saint Mary's mis. 

Virginia Henry Holt 

English 

A.B., Smith College; A.M.. University of Virginia 

William K. Stone _ n- . r ■ 

- . History, Economics and Sociology 
A.B., Harvard 

Elna Perkins 

Science 
B.B., University of New Hampshire; M.S., University of Pennsylvania 

Edith Terrili 

Science 
A.B., Hollins; M.A., Columbia University 

Mary Boiiannon 

French 

A. IV. William and Mar) 

Bertha Ruef 

French 

A.M.. M.A.. Vassnr College 

. Ruth Lineberry 

■ Mathematics 

A.M.. Meredith: M.A., Columbia 

Evelyn L. Way _ ,, , 

Mathematics 

A.M., Sweet Briar 

Susan Reams Cooke. . _ _ , 

£ nglish 

Ph.B., University of Chicago 

I-.ORA E. SlMBOLOTTI _ ,, . , , „ 

_ Spanish and Irene h 

Berlitz School of Language. Boston 

Mabel Julia Shapcott _ 

Latin 
A.B., Colorado College; A.M.. Columbia University 

Caroline Agee r ... 

Unglts/l and History 

A. IV, Agnes Scott College; M.A., Columbia University 

Edith Scott Roberts... _ r ,. , , ... 

English and History 
A.B., Vamlcrbilt University! A.M., George Peabody College for Teachers 

Grace Houciien PL .',.. 

rhy steal Education 

Harvard University Department of Physical Education; Peabody College 



Twenty-six 




Twenty-seven 



iWusie department 

William H. Jones, A.A.G.O., Director p ian0> q,^ ^ rWy 

A.B., Trinity College; Berlin, Germany 

Lelia Tricc __ „. 

Piano 

Royal f'onservutory, Leipzig 

Ethel Fielding. ,. . 

1 (}Ue 

New England Conservatory r>f Music 
Elva B. Nicholson _ n . 

Mount Allison Conservatory 

Miss Bessie Rave McMillan.. ,-■ ,- 

Pupil of Gustavc Hagedorn 

£u:t department 

Edith Hohn... Drawing, Painting, Design 

B.D., Sophie Newcomb College 

expression department 

Florence C. Davis, Director... Expression, Dramatic Art 

B.O., Emerson College 



Justness department 



Lizzie H. Lee Stenography, Typewriting, Bookkeeping 

J&ome economics Bepartment 

Elizabeth Bason.. Domestic Science, Domestic Art 

A.R., Flora McDonald; Teacher's College, Columbia 



fifteens 192 7=1928 



Rev. Warren W. Way Rector 

Miss Catherine Albertson... '.'".Dean'of Students 



Miss Virginia Henry Holt. . Academic Head 

Miss Kate McKimmon... Special Supervisor 

Mrs. Huch McLeod • ™ 

Mrs. Nannie H. Marriott .Dietitian 

Miss Florence U. Talbot... ■ Assistant Housekeeper 

Miss Annie Alexander, R.N Matron of Infirmary 

Graduate of St. Vincent's Hospital, Norfolk, Va. 

Mrs. Fripp... Assistant Nurse 

Dr. H. B. Haywood, Jr School Physician 

A.W.Tucker Secretary and Business Manager 

B.B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Miss Juliet B. Sutton _' Secretary to Rector 

Miss Mary Lewis Sasser 0$cc Secretary 

Mrs. Frank Nash .Librarian 



Twenty-eight 




Twenty-nine 




®i)t g>cf)ool Council ©fftcers 

FACULTY 

Mr. Way 

Miss Holt --.Chairman 

■ - Secretary 

HONOR COMMITTEE 
Elizabeth Platt_ 

Phoebe Harding President 

Secretary 

MEMBERS 

,!''■"," Eleanor Gibson Elizabeth [ohnson 

M« £™ Margaret Cameron Margaret Harris 

Mr. Stone Margaret Fox Anna Bohannon 

M T Shirley Noble Virginia Taylor 

• 1UCKEK Elizabeth Thornberry Frances Haigh 



Thirty 




SENIOR 






/,.'/.//, "//-/ 



/ ' / 



Thirty-one 




Mr. Stone 

Class Adviser 



Mrs. Tucker 
Class Mother 



Mr. Jones 
Class Sponsor 



Mentor Clasps 



Colors: Green and White 



Flower: Marechal Neil Rose 



Motto: Ever onward, ever upward 

Class 0(tittx& 

Phoebe Randolph Harding President 

Margaret Earle Harris Vice President 

Helen Andrus Secretary-Treasurer 

Sarah Evins Historian 

Leora Hiatt Testator 

Elizabeth Johnson Prophet 

Harriet Garrett Poet 





Class a&oii 




Agee 


Evins 


Harris 


Norton 


Andrus 


Falkener 


Hiatt 


Platt 


Battle 


Gaillard 


Hicks 


Ritter 


Bohannon 


Garrett 


Hoggard 


Sandlin 


Curry 


Glover 


Johnson 


Smith, P. 


Duff 


Hallvburton 


Lawrence 


Tucker, S. 


Dunn 


Harding 


McKinne 


Williams, E 



Thirty-two 




Sigma 



Ellen Douglass Agee 

Anniston, Ala. 
1926-192S 



E. A. P. 



AltarGuild (2);Latin Club (l);Glee Club (1); Volley- 
ball (2): Basketball Manager (2); Basketball Team 
(1, 2); Track Team (2); Swimming Team (1); Cluircli 
Warden (2}. 

What is it that makes all the old girls love 
her and the new girls fall? Is it charm? Ask 
Cam and she will tell you at length. Anyway 
we do know that she is a clear-thinking young 
lady, loyal to the Sigmas. Her hardest work 
for them came with the basket-ball season 
when she was manager and a good one (this 
from a Mu!). We can hear her now saying, 
"Good Gravy, Oi never hoid of such a thing," 
in her best Alabama dialect. She is a carefree, 
independent, good sport and lots of fun. Ask 
Dull. 



Uu 



Helen Stockton Andrus 

German town, Penn. 
1925-192S 



E. A. P. 



E. A. V. Custodian (2); E. A. P. Treasurer <3); Choir 
(1, 2, 3); Choir Librarian (2, 3); Class Secretary-Treas- 
urer (3); Honor Committee (2); Dramatic Club (1, 2, 3); 
Sketch Club (1, 2); College Club (3); Assistant, Miss 
Sutton's Offiee (2, 3); Gym Tournament (2); Altar 
Guild (2. 3); Vice-president Y. P. S. L. (2, 3). 

Helen came down from the North to be a 
student at St. Mary's. She takes care of all 
Senior Hall; every one goes to her for medical 
aid, and once she had the courage to treat a 
Senior meeting to refreshments. Helen is very 
popular with her teachers, too, because she 
has them so badly fooled about being a good 
student! Anybody who has the time to read 
"Good Housekeeping" as much as she does is 
putting up a good bluff, n'est-ce pas? 

P. S. This is inside dope from her roommate ! 



Thirty-three 




Mu 



Josephine Battle 

Rocky Mount, N. C. 

1925-1928 



E. A. P. 



Altar Guild (1, 2, 3); Vice President E. A. P. (3); 
President of College Club (3); Chairman of Program 
Committee E. A. P. (3); Marshal (1, 2); Church Warden 
(3); Granddaughters Club (I, 2, 3); Maid of Honor (3). 

"Tiny" is an enigma. She is so lively and 
clever when she is off campus, seeking sustaining 
grape-juice at the Little Store or stylishly 
wearing her "fuir" coat, that we look on in 
amazement when we see Mr. Way incline his 
ear unto her most assiduously, for her opinion 
on the authorship of Hebrews, for example. 
Mr. Stone, also, is tremendously interested in 
Battles, perhaps because in "Hortense" we 
lind the true personification of a gracious and 
attractive daughter of the Old South. 



Mu 



Anna Ethel Bohannan 

Surry, Va. 
1926-1928 

Sigma Lambda 



College Club {1, 2): Latin Club (1); Glee Club (1); 
Altar Guild (1, 2); President Altar Guild (2); Letter 
Club (1, 2); Second MuTeam (1, 2); Pan-Archon Council 
(1, 2); School Council (1, 2); Choir (1, 2). 

That Anna is a member of the Student Council 
means she has a high sense of honor and re- 
sponsibility. As in this, she puts her whole self 
into whatever she is doing: basketball, Bible \, 
swimming, trips to town with Sara, and especially 
the work of the Altar Guild of which she is an 
efficient President. Even her '"Vic" is thorough, 
for "Among My Souvenirs" has to wake us up 
five minutes before the bell even' morning. In 
spite of these things she is not by any means a 
Saint "too good for this earth" as she can laze 
around and "have fun" with the worst of us. 



Thirty-four 




Sydney Curry 
Raleigh, N. C. 
1924-1928 
Mil 

Sydney Curry may be characterized by one 
adjective — dependable. She does her best in 
everything, athletic and scholastic. She is 
steady in gym, and in basketball. But, oh, 
she does shine in French! And how! Sydney 
always gets the question and the answer — 
which means something — in French. She is 
pleasant, witty, and friendly — the kind of a 
girl Saint Mary's likes to have. We feel some- 
how that Sydney is destined to become a great 
captain of industry, from the way she under- 
stands the most difficult principles of Eco- 
nomics. We also feel that whatever she engages 
in will be a success, as it deserves to be. 



Mu 



Mary Katherine Duff 

Elizabeth City, N. C. 

1926-1928 



E. A. P. 



Third team basketball (1); Second team basketball 
(2); Dramatic Club (1); Commencement plav (1); 
Altar Guild (1, 2); Choir (1, 2); Swimming Meet (1); 
College Club (1, 2); Business Manager of Stage Coach 
(2); Pan-Archon Council (2); Latin Club (2); Cheer 
Leader (2); Supervisor Senior Hall (2); Brass Com- 
mittee (1); Chairman of Linen Committee (2); Cus- 
todian of the Banner (2). 

Who would ever think of associating the 
dignified ''Mary Katherine" with our "Duff." 
Yet to tell the truth she has many sides. Besides 
her dual personality of the carefree playmate 
and seriotis confidante, she necessarily has 
business ability, for the Stage Coach advertise- 
ments call her to town in every spare minute. 
(We know it is an effort for her to go!) Add to 
this that she passes Latin and Is Mu cheer- 
leader and you have an almost complete picture 
of this young lady. The staff says unanimously 
three cheers for the good old "Bus. Manager.' ' 



Thirty-five 




Sigma 



Sarah Elford Evins 

Spartanburg, S. C. 

1923-1928 

Sigma Lar, 



bda 



College Club (2, 3, 4, 5); Second Team Volleyball 
(2, 3, 4); First Team Volleyball (5); Class Historian (5). 

Sara might be called the matriarch of the 
class, for she has been here ever since she was 
called the "Healthiest Baby" of prepdom. Once 
again Sara is to feature in statistics — this time 
as the "Most shy" Senior. Saint Mary's and 
especially Mr. Stone will miss her arriving, long 
after the last, to classes. Aside from this defect 
she is jolly, generous and the soul of honor. 



Mm 



Emma Stevenson Dunn 

New Bern, N. C. 

1926-1 92S 



E. A. P. 



Granddaughters Club (1, 2); Altar Guild (1. 2): 
Third Team Basketball (I); College Club (1, 2); School 
Orchestra (1); W. G. T. Club (2); Santa Claus (2); 

Secretary Granddaughters Club (2). 

She is never out of sorts, even after her 
Waterloo — Spanish. Indeed her chief char- 
acteristic seems to be a cheerful attitude in 
classes which she enlivens with witty remarks. 
Of the faculty she fears none. Among her lesser 
qualities are a delight in the maximum of visits 
to the Edwards-Cain drug store and a habit of 
keeping her Bible notebook up-to-date. In the 
parlor every night the call of "Bay" brings her 
forth to agitate the ivories for the evening 
performance of the Dixie Romp. 



Thirty-six 




Sarah Gilmour Falkener 

Goldsboro, N. C. 

1926-1928 



Mu 



E, A. P. 



Dramatic Club (1, 2); College Chit) (1, 2); Altar Guild 
(1, 2); Literary Editor Bulletin {1); Commencement; 
Plav (1); Program Committee E. A. P. Literary Society 
(I); Pan-Archon Council (2); Class Prophet (2); Pres- 
ident of E. A. P. Literary Society (2). 

Sarah might be known as "that bright girl". 
and every one would agree that she deserved the 
title. She differs from the rest of us in always 
understanding her lessons as well as remember- 
ing them. Vet she strays from the path of 
learning more than once or twice a week to 
patronize the little drug store. The Mus 
say that at the basketball games she is little 
but loud, which speaks for itself of her pep. 
She may have her faults, but this isn't where 
we're supposed to tell about them, so we say 
anywhere, any time, "Sarah's all right!" 



Julia Loper Gaillard 

Raleigh, N. C. 

1923-1928 

Sigma E. A. P. 

Have you ever watched Julia? She keeps 
still and doesn't say much, but when she is 
called on she certainly does toe the mark. We 
like to hear her sing in the choir on the occasional 
corporate visits of the Saint Mary's girls to 
Good Shepherd Church. Wherever Julia is, 
Jewel is also. We shall judge from appearances 
and call her a loyal friend. We don't know 
Julia as well as we'd like to, for she is a little 
bashful, but she has a cheerful attitude and 
we're for her! 



Thirty-seven 




Sigma 



Harriet Nicholls Garrett 

Williamsburg, Va. 

1926-1928 



E. A. P. 



College Club (1); Dramatic Club (1); Altar Guild 
(1, 2); Latin Club, charter member (1, 2); Track Team 
(1, 2); Third Team Basketball (1, 2); Swimming Team 
fl); Second Team Vollevball (1, 2); Manager of Track 
(2); Apple Club (1); Doctors' Daughters Club (1); 
Editor of Bulletin (2); Assistant Editor of Annual 
(21; Representative to Blue Ridge (1); Pan-Archon 
Council (2); Letter Club (2); Class Poet (2). 

"Big things come in small packages" — that 
is "Ree" al! over. The list of her accomplish- 
ments is a long one. She can "do athletics,' 1 
play piano duets with Lela, paint pictures, 
drag in A\* for good guesswork and pilot the 
Bulletin as its Editor. Moreover, she is the 
co-partner of Leslie in their attractive and 
successful gift shop for Virginia jets, which are 
made over the radiator in secret sessions of the 
firm. How she does it all Ree has never told 
us, but we have our ideas as to her cleverness 
and talent. 



Sarah Glover 

Charlotte, N. C. 

1926-1928 

Sigma E. J. P. 

Charlotte, N. C, sent a great many girls to 
Saint Mary's this year and chief among them, 
by virtue of being a Senior, is Sarah Glover. 
She stands out for other reasons too — as "Most 
Lovable" Senior, for Sarah is famed for her good 
disposition. She is, however, independent in 
spirit — witness the day she stood up by the 
radiator during the whole Economics Class to 
keep warm. She is a good dancer and tennis 
player, making her activities rather well 
balanced. One more thing: her dignity and 
neatness of dress impress us, because she is 
truly feminine. 



Thirty-eight 




Emily Howard Hallyburton 

Griffin, Ga. 

1926-192S 



Mu 



E. A. P. 



Sketch Club (1); College Club (1, 2); Assistant Art 
Editor Stage Coach (1); Art Editor Stage Coach 
(2); Church Librarian (2). 

What? Not heard of "Little Em"? Astound- 
ing! Shocking! Nay — even more— impossible! 
I mean honestly, my dear, her fame is far- 
reaching. She is the Artist of the Stage Coach 
and all that, of course, but she is best known 
for her work with Soap. Em' is pretty — her 
features would make a Greek Goddess green 
with envy; she is feminine — the Senior Class 
voted that unanimously; she is attractive — 
witness her influence on the opposite sex; she is 
charming and lovable. "Little Em" truly has 
all the desirable qualities. 



Sigma 



Phozbe Randolph Harding 

Washington, N. C. 

1924-1928 



E. A. P. 



Senior Class President (4); Commencement Marshal 
(4); Winner Short Story Contest (2, 3); Winner Poem 
Contest (3); Vice President Junior Class (3); Christmas 
Play (4); Honor Committee Member (2-4); Secretary 
Honor Committee (4); Member of School Council (4)j 
Altar Guild (3-4); Member of Pan-Archon Council (4); 
Associate Editor Bulletin (3); Sigma Track Team 
(1, 2); College Club (1, 2. 3, 4); Choir (2, 3); Time Keeper 
for Sigmas (3, 4); Glee Club (1, 2); Sigma Swimming 
Team (3); "Open Forum" (3); "S. M. S." (2); Secretary 
Epsilon Alpha Pi Literarv Society (3); Herald May 
Court (2, 3); North Carolina Club (1, 2, 3, 4); Grand- 
daughters Club (1, 2, 3, 4); Latin Club (3); Assistant 
Editor Stage Coach (3); "Best Dance Follower" (3). 

Laughing on the outside, bubbling with pep, 
but deep down under all this, there are in 
Phcebe those qualities desired by every one, 
attained by a few — sincerity, magnetism, 
originality and poise. But success has not 
always crowned our President, for her main 
aspiration, to be May. Queen, has for three 
successive years received "thumbs down" from 
the student body. Why mind her dejection, 
tho', — she is dancing to fame. 



Thirty-nine 




Sigma 



Margaret Earle Harris 

Henderson, N. C. 

1926-1928 



Sigma Lambda 



College Club (1, 2); Treasurer (2); Marshal (2); 
Student Council (2); Vice President Senior Class (2); 
Altar Guild (2). 

What's that growth behind that nose? Why 
— you nub, that's the face of Polly Harris, 
inventor. Her inventions run mostly to voca- 
bulary, but we must admit they are clever. As, 
attired in her latest "Spring model," Polly 
saunters "Down the street" to town, her 
costume is always sure to be an artistically 
matched "Number." Polly is really an au- 
thority on clothes and how to wear them. Her 
never failing liveliness can be heard in all parts 
of the "lower regions" in which she lives. Isn't 
her vivacious charm evident from the expressions 
she has invented? 



Sigma 



Leora Cromwell Hiatt 

High Point, N.C. 

1926-1928 

Siema Lambda 



Vice President of College Club (2); Vice President of 
Sigma Lambda (2); Dramatic Club (1, 2); Altar Guild 
(1,2); Chairman of Program Committee Sigma Lambda 
(2); Class Testator; Doctors' Daughters Club (I, 2); 
College Club (1); W. G. E. (2). 

"Bill 11 has the weight of Senior Hall's business 
affairs on her frail shoulders. Chief of these are 
gardening and worrying over Norton's pets. 
Yet in her free moments she delights In in- 
struction because she is truly an authority on 
any subject from marginal utility on up to 
the winning touchdown for State. Miss Davis 
hopes to make something of a speaker of "Bill" 
and it ought to be easy, for give "Bill" a lead 
and she's off for the day. Billy is darling; she 
is attractive; she is efficient; she is vividly alive. 



Forty 




Mu 



Julia Brent Hicks 

Oxford, N. C. 

1925-1928 

Sigma Lambda 



Treasurer Sigma Lambda (I!); Glee Club (:i); Super- 
visor East Wing (3); Assistant Business Manager Stage 
Coach Staff (:!); Chape!Line(l, 2,3);Monday Detention 
Club; College Club (1). 

There are several girls here this year whom a 
very large person could put in his pocket; 
Julia Brent is one of these. She is really a very 
small person, about the size of Jackie or Emily. 
For all her littleness she has an independent 
spirit for she did not follow the crowd and room 
in Senior Hall. She needs it, however, in 
chasing ads for the annual. And speaking of 
town, we would like to ask one question — 
"When does she study?" Yet she gets through. 
It must be heavenly to have a good time as 
Julia Brent does, to keep up in classes and 
still enjoy life to the utmost. 



Mu 



Elizabeth Hoggard 

Wilmington, N. C. 

1926-I92S 

Sigma Lambda 



Letter Club (1,2); Piesident Letter Club (2); Manager 
Basketball (1); Track Meet (1.2); First Basketball Team 
1 1, 2); First VoDeyball Team (1. 2); Viee President Jin's 
(2); Altar Guild Hi; College Club (1, 2); Glee Club (1); 
Marshal <l, 2); Traek Letters (1, 2); Basketball Letters 
(1. 2); Volleyball Letter (1); Alternate for Sigma 
Lambda Debaters (1); Pan-Arelion Council (2). 

First choice of the Mus — that is "Hoggy." 
Quite a title to live up to, isn't it? But she has 
made the grade. One of the best basketball 
players anybody ever saw, good in each position, 
she also broke three track records and was 
chosen as the most athletic member of the 
Student Body. . Everybody loves "Hoggy." 
Those coveted "specials" come in for her everv 
day. We can't blame the boys though, can we? 
Here's to "Hoggy"— an all-round sport. 



Forty -one 




Elizabeth Jeter Johnson 

Eustis, Florida 

1925-1928 



Mu 



E. A. P. 



College Club (1, 2, 3); Secretary College Club (3); 
Altar Guild (1, 2, 3); Vice President E. A. P. (2); As- 
sociate Editor Bulletin (2); Literary Editor Stage 
Coach (2, 3); Latin Club (3); Cla.ss Prophet (3); School 
Council (3); "Most Original" (3); Chapel Warden (3). 

Every one of us admires Elizabeth, from Lela 
up to Leslie and the rest of the Seniors. Who 
could be more efficient without looking it; more 
feminine without studying the art? All the 
Seniors know they can go to her for advice for 
they respect her unfailing judgment. Swapping 
costumes with Nancy is her strong point, besides 
being famed for originality and wit, for which 
she is in statistics. We are wondering if she 
will follow in Katherine's footsteps and repre- 
sent Saint Mary's at Carolina. 



Mu 



Virginia Corbelle Lawrence 

Lumberton, N. C. 

1925-1928 

Sigma Lambda 



Granddaughters Club (1, 2, 3); Sigma Alpha Chi 
(2, 3); College Club (1, 2, 3); Glee Club (3); Christmas 
Play (4). 

If we had any forecast of the fates, we should 
say that Miss Jackie (nee Virginia) Lawrence, 
is one of those who are very "likely to marry." 
And if that is the case, some one is going to be 
very happy, if tact, good-nature and good looks 
mean anything — especially the last. She is 
moreover a smart little thing, because she keeps 
up her school work and still manages to write 
that daily letter to her — home(r). What say, 
Jackie? Did we get it right? 



Forty-two 




Mu 



Olivia McKinne 

Louisburg, N. C. 

1926-1928 



E. A. P. 



College Club (1, 2); Choir (1, 2); Latin Club (1, 2); 
/Edile of Latin Club (2). 

Shy and retiring when she first came, now she 
is jolly and talkative as any of us. Her favorite 
subjects of conversation are, Arvin and Miss 
Lee. A rare mixture! She will try to persuade 
you at times that she is the most neglected and 
abused human being existing. However, if you 
put on a doleful face and declare that you are 
grievously mistreated she wilt grin and say, 
"You look it." Proctoring is her pet aversion 
and eating her chief delight. Generosity and 
sympathy describe Olivia exactly. A journal- 
istic career is her ambition now, but who can 
tell whom or what the fates hold in store for her? 



Virginia Martha Norton 

Savannah, Ga. 

1924-1928 

Sigma Sigma Lambda 

Second Team Basketball (1); Track Team (1); 
Georgia Club (1); Second Team Volleyball (2); Choir 
(2); Glee Club (2, 4): School Orchestra (2. 3); Dramatic 
Club {3, 4); Doctor's Daughters Club (3); Swimming 
Team (2, 3, 4); Letter Club, Charter Member (3, 4); 
Sigma Letter (2, 3); First Team Basketball (3, 4); 
Program Committee Sigma Lambdas (4); Chapel 
Librarian (4); Altar Guild (4); College Club (4). 

"Who's that darling Senior that guarded 

tonight? She's some basketball player!" But 
not only is "Ginnie" an athletic Senior, she is 
also graduating a whole year ahead of her own 
class. Ginnie is open-hearted which is shown 
by her many loves — Blackie, Blackie, Jr. 
(deceased), the uke and the typewriter. She is 
enthusiastic over all of them. She dances and 
swims and goes to "the store" with us, ready for 
anything. And we must not forget that Norton 
was a runner-up in statistics for "most likely 
to marry." 



Forty -three 




Sigma 



Elizabeth Platt 

Havana, Cuba 

1923-1 92S 



E. A. P 



Southern Club (1); Elizabethan Club (1); .Second 
Team Volleyball (1, 3); First Team Volleyball (2, 4); 
Track Team (2); Choir (2, 3, 4, 5); Sketch Club (2, 3); 
Cheer Leader (2, 3); School News Editor of Bulletin (3); 
Member of Committee (3, 4, 5); President of Sopho- 
mores (3); Altar Guild (4, 5); "Best Leader" (4); Junior 
President (4); Letter Club (4, 5); Letter Girl (4); Man- 
ager of Volleyball; President of Student Body (5); 
Chairman of Honor Committee (5); Seeretary of School 
Council (.I); Pan-Arehon Council (3, 4, 5); College 
Club {3, 4); Secretary and Treasurer of College Club 
(4); Swimming Team (4); Cotillion Club (4); "Most. 
Representative" (5); "Most Influential" (5); "Most 
Versatile" (5); S. M. S. Club (3); Open Forum (4); 
Chief Marshal. 

Because she lias made a wise Student Body 
President, we honor and respect her; because 
she can fit in any phase of school life from gym 
to jazz, we personally know her; but it is because 
"Platt" is always her natural self that we love 
her. Yet with all her ideal qualities she is 
human enough to banish any picture of halos, 
(N.B. Her pet weaknesses are falling up the 
stairs and talking to herself.) 



Sigma 



Leslie Harrison Ritter 

Newport News, Va. 

1926-1928 



E. A. P. 



Track (1); Varsity Basketball <\, 2); Letter Club (1, 2); 
Altar Guild (I, 2); Chairman of Altar Guild (2); Dele- 
gate to Camp Penick (1); Volleyball (1). 

Leslie is frank and impulsive and likable. She 
is independent and goes her own way, not caring 
what the rest of the world thinks or does. Her 
especial liking is dogs — clean dogs. If you want 
to see regular basketball, watch Leslie get the 
tip-off almost every time for her team. Sigma 
spirit? whew! ! Maybe Leslie's got a hot 
temper, but that goes along with her frankness, 
and you don't mind it. Everybody calls on 
Leslie, from "Miss Katie" when she's lonely to 
the Sigmas when they want an apple. She's 
honest, kind-hearted, and sincere all the way 
through, one of the best. 



Forty-four 




Sigma 



Ida Jewel Sandlin 

Raleigh, N. C. 

1926-1928 



E. A. P. 



We love Jewel's apologetic little smile when 
Mr. Stone asks her a question very suddenly- 
just when she and Julia are in the midst of a 
very important discussion on the next tea; 
and we love still better her triumphant air when 
after sufficient repetition of the question she 
answers correctly. As in this, in everything. 
Jewel always comes up smiling. The day 
students seem to have a pretty good time of it 
anyway. 



AIu 



Pattie Sherwood Smith 

Somerville, N. J. 

1926-192S 



Sivma Lambda 



Granddaughters Club (1, 2); Colleye Club (1, 2); 
Altar Guild (1); Second Team Volleyball (1, 2); Super- 
visor Sniedes Hall (1); Sigma Lambda Debater (1); 
Latin Club Charter Member (1, 2); Editor-in-Chief 
.Stage Coach (2); Pan-Archon Council (2). 

Whether it is running the Annual or getting 
to town, Pattie does it with the same brisk 
efficiency. Her trials and tribulations have not 
spoiled her disposition, however, and she waits 
for the publication of the Annual with the same 
undaunted smile that we see when she is planted 
in the foot of the steps waiting for Olivia, or 
Sarah. Pattie is never out of sorts and her 
cryptic comments on life in general, her un- 
failing knowledge and ability and willingness to 
help, make her popularity universal as well as 
deserved. 



Forty- five 




Suzanne Tucker 
Raleigh, N. C. 
1925-1928 
Sigma 

Suzanne is a drawer, according to Mr. Stone. 
She draws pictures in every class and statistics 
prove that she also draws attention and friends, 
for she is very much sought-after both here and 
at State because of her general liveliness. As a 
student she sticks with us, even occasionally 
scoring a home-run in classes. She won her 
certificate in Art at the end of her Junior year. 
Certainly she is very charming and attractive. 
What more could any one desire? 



Erma Elizabeth Williams 

Kenansville, N. C. 

1924-1928 

Sigma Sigma Lambda 

North Carolina Club (1, 2); College Club (1, 2, 3, 4); 
Charter Member of the Latin Club (3); Choir (2); 
Glee Club (4); School Orchestra (3); Only Child's Club 
(2); Second Team Basketball (2); Sigma Letter (3); 
Letter Club (3, 4); Third Team Basketball (4); Track 
Team (2); First Team Volleyball (4); Student Council 
(3); Altar Guild (4); Pan-Archon Council (4); President 
of the Sigma Lambda Literary Society (4); Commenee- 
meneement Usher (3); Sigma Lambda Model Meeting 
(3); Supervisor Senior Hall (4). 

A good Sigma; a good student and a sweet 
girl; that is Erma. Besides her playing basket- 
ball we envy her to death her ability to study 
for five minutes and get 95 on an Economics 
test. Yet she is what Miss Ruef would call 
"consciencieuse." Goodness only knows what 
the Sigma Lambdas will do next year without 
her to keep order and run things. Best of all is 
her sincerity in everything — friendship, work, 
play. What more can you ask? 



Forty-six 



Clastf $oem 



TIFE is a song, played by each one; 
-*— ' The touch may be harsh or gay. 
It's the same old song, and how it's done 
Is the difference in the play. 

The prelude's o'er, 'tis closing now 
With its sadness and its fun. 
The performance starts, we make our bow. 
The real music has just begun. 

But if the prelude is thrillingly sweet, 
Or if 'tis heavy and dull, 
So will the music that follows it be 
Unfeeling, or rythmic and full. 

Here at Saint Mary's, our prelude 
Was a composition true, 
Of jolly notes, and a deeper mood, 
And a merry trill or two. 

The melodies are friendship strong, 
Harmonies of the heart; 
The things we learn are the deep bass notes 
That with splendid touch are wrought. 

As the tune of the music varies, 
From the prelude to full song 
We bid our farewell to St. Mary's 
To let the music go on. 



Forty-seven 



^fje ^istorj) of tfje Class of 1928 

Sn (Ebucattonal jftlm in Jfibc Steels 

Copyright by Saint Mary's School. 
Licensed by the Class of '28. 
Scenario by Sarah Evins. 
Censored by Miss Virginia Holt. 
Cast of characters; The Class of '28. 

SETTING: A dreary, rainy day. September 11, 1923. Saint Mary's School in harmony with the weather and 
not a soul in sight. Soon the new girls begin to arrive— a sadder company of girls can scarcely be found any- 
where. General atmosphere very moist, it is not long, however, before the tears are dried for school lias .started 

in earnest and the little crowd of preplets are gathered together into one band. 

Reel I. Excitement, all is excitement! Preps are being introduced to the Bloomer Party. On one side of the gym 
arc the blue Mus yelling: "M-U, that's the way to spell it!" while on the other the Siginas are screaming: "Hay, ray- 
row, row— Sigmas show 'cm how!" Now the Preps are bewildered by a succession of parties; first, the Hallowe'en 
party — then the class parties. But the poor little preps are left out— the Seniors entertain the Sophs and the .Juniors 
the Freshmen, but they, poor things, are forced to entertain themselves. At the end of the year they are introduced to 
their first class day exercises. They think they are "It" dressed in their white dresses and blue and pink hair ribbons 
as they sing to the tune of "Barney Google": "Hail the Prep class, the best est class of all!" 

Reel II. Next September finds the Class gathered together again. They have all grown a great deal and cut a very 
different figure. Miss Morgan and Miss Turner, however, keep them subdued as much as possible. They feel very grown 
up and proud when the Junior Class gives them a party this year, to which they conic dressed in short dresses, socks. 
and hair-ribbons — each child being escorted by a nurse. The whole year is taken up with the usual round of activities 
and studies. 

Reel III. The opening picture is again a dreary September day. The Sophs progress in many ways this year for 
their sisters, the dignified Seniors, give them advice on how to act. The general atmosphere has changed. Miss Morgan, 
the principle, is no longer with them, but they have a new leader. Miss Albertson, whom they learn to love dearly. 
There is an addition to the school property this year— a beautiful swimming pool. The class rejoices exceedingly over 
this, though several members have to attend study-hall for sticking chewing-gum in the shower-room. Elizabeth 
Piatt, who started out in '23 as a baby prep, is now president of the class. Miss Monroe is the director and the east 
works willingly under her leadership. 

Reel IV. Cast seems somewhat changed — there is an air of sophistication. The little band of Preps of ''2-1 are so- 
phisticated Juniors. On Hallowe'en their Devils' cave is a terror to the poor Preps. Although there is plenty of fun 
there are new responsibilities as well. The cast works hard over dinners and sandwich-sales to make money for the 
Junior-Senior Banquet. Then, there is English M which tends to take the joy out of life by taking up from two to three 
hours three days out of the week. They are rewarded, however, for their labor for they can go down town in pairs 
twice a week, can go calling, and it is rumored that some Juniors even attend the movies occasionally. With May 
conies the Junior-Senior Banquet, the result of their labors. The Sir Walter is decorated in maroon and gray in hunur 
of the Senior Class, On the last day of school the class, the Senior Class now, goes to the little store for the first lime. 
a privilege which they enjoyed immensely and are destined to enjoy still more the following year. 

Reel V. At last the actresses have reached their goal and are stars. They make up the Senior class now and feel 
very much honored in having Mrs. Tucker as Class Mother, Phoebe Harding as President, and Mr. Jones and Mr. Stone 
as sponsors. On Hallowe'en the Seniors have their stunt. While still on location they give an impromptu — a burlesque 
of the faculty. The Christmas festivities follow soon after the Carolina game on Thanksgiving. The class gives a 
play entitled 'The Spirit of the Silver Slippers, written by Phcebe Harding. Christinas vacation over, there is a sudden 
break in the film. Mr. Stone, their beloved teacher and sponsor is dead. Though he is dead the class will never forget 
him and his splendid example will live with them. It is hard for the class to begin work but the ever-dreaded examina- 
tions come in February and the exams are harder this year as Saint Mary's has become an A I Junior College. Spriug 
holidays come soon after exams and in May is the Junior-Senior Banquet. The Seniors take their privilege of giving 
an entertainment— this year a play. Again, there is commencement rehearsal. The Seniors must now say goodbye 
to their dear Alma Mater. It is very hard to do but the class feels that a victory is won. 



Forty-eight 



E&e mm 



WE, the Senior class of 1928, being gathered together in solemn assembly on the eve of our departure into the great 
unknown, have reached the important decision that, as we have attained woman's estate, it is the due and proper 
time for us to put away childish things. However, fearing that if we desert them, they will be neglected and not 
given the proper care they deserve, we leave our most cherished possessions with all our love and affection to those 
who we believe will give them the attention they need. 

1. The Senior class leaves to the oncoming Senior class (that means the Juniors) the out-of-doors Christmas tree. 
You are to continue this custom and make it one of Saint Mary's Traditions. It will be a living memorial to the Senior 
class of 1*128. 

2. The Hallowe'en lantern which our Class Mother gave us, we give to Sara Redding. Please hang it next Hallowe'en 
on the hall light of the new Junior-Senior Building and allow it to remain there for at least two months; this custom 
being established by the present Senior class. 

3. We leave our "honorable flower garden" to the Juniors. This entails two gifts, one the garden itself and the other 
the grave of our dear, departed "Blackic." The former we leave to Caroline Tucker and the latter to Elizabeth 
Thombcrry. The tulips that were laboriously planted last fall are to be picked and put on "Blackie's" grave. Wehave 
left 5 cents in the treasury to start a fund for the erection of a tombstone to commemorate his cheerful attitude while 
among us. 

-1. Virginia Norton leaves the home of the deceased "Blackie" to Angie Luther for her canary, withonestipulation, 
that once every week it is to be given an extra portion of seed as a mute tribute to the immortal "Blackie." 

5. The picture of Gloria Swanson which was given to the class of '26 being now in the possession of Phoebe and Piatt, 
is left by them to the new Senior Hall. This masterpiece is to be guarded with the greatest anxiety. On your departure 
from childish tilings it is to be left to the Junior most worthy of that honor. 

6. The firm, Garrett and Ritter, leaves the money that it has made this year on Virginia Jets, for the building of 
an Infirmary for all stray dugs who come to the new Senior Hall. It wishes to leave this as a memorial to "Senior" 
(or "Joe"). 

7. To Texie Boggess, "Hoggic" leaves the assistant managership of the new Junior-Senior Hall. 

8. Jackie Lawrence and Pattie Smith leave their perfect understanding and sweet dispositions as roommates as a 
model for all Seniors next year. 

I). Jewel Sand! in and Julia Gaillard leave (heir class spirit to the Juniors. They have been faithful I his year in getting 
pine-tops for Christmas plays ami running errands for the Seniors. 

10. Polly Harris and Elizabeth Johnson leave their Greta Garbo profiles and their wonderful complexions to Pie 
Smith. 

11. Bay Dunn, with celerity, leaves the piano-playing in the parlor to Jean Huutz. 

12. Susanne Tucker leaves her smiling face and her "pictures" to the Economics class. 

12. Tiny Battle and Emily Hallybuiton leave the extremely important knowledge that from Smedes Hall steps to 
the front of the Little Store, using the diagonal path, there are one thousand ami nine stcp,s, and a half step extra when 
you step over the threshold. 

14. Sidney Curry leaves her French grades to Annie Parker VYinbornc. 

It. In spite of hard work, eternal studying, mumps almost, and other afflictions, "Kack" Duff has lasted through 
this year, and leaves her determination and will-power to the new Business Manager of the Stage Coach. 

If). Sara Falkener and Erma Williams leave to the Epsilon Alpha Pi's and Sigma Lambda's their untiring devotion 
and loyalty. 

16. Sara Evins, our most ancient classmate, who has been here at dear Saint Mary's longer than any of the rest of the 
Dignified Seniors, leaves this distinguished anil honored position to Virginia Taylor. 

17. To the new president of the Altar Guild, we leave Anna Bohannon's faithfulness and cheerfulness in the discharge 
of her duty and privilege this year. 

18. Sarah Glover leaves her deepest sympathy for all poor Seniors who will be required to room in the new Senior Hall 
next year and therefore will not be allowed to room in the "Rock." 

10. Helen Andrus and Olivia Mclvinnie leave their Damon-Pythias friendship to Betty Hoyt and Mary Baker Pitt. 

20. We, the Seniors as a whole, leave to our class mother, Mrs. Tucker, our very best love. 

21. To Mr. Jones, our class adviser, we leave uur sincere thanks anil love. 

22. To Mrs. Stone we leave our love for dear Mr. Stone whom we loved as our class sponsor and friend, and 

23. To Miss Albertson, Miss Holt, Mr. Way and Mr. Tucker our deep appreciation for all they have done for us this 
year. 



Forty-nine 



Class $ropfjecp 



I was visiting Tiny in Raleigh when the "round-robin" of the class of '28 made its fourth annual round. Between the 
outbursts of screams and slapa from the nursery, Tiny and I read it aloud— giggling reminiscently as we thought 

how the four years had changed our one-time sisters. Ellen Agee wrote that she was teaching gym at Saint Mary's. 
but that, never having learned to clog, she had been forced to leave that out of the course, much to the general sorrow. 
Helen Andrus, answering "the call of the wild," was in Africa saving souls and was not able to write for herself but 
Anna Bohannon said she was making great strides in the native conversions; also instituting various great American 
customs sueh as Saturday immersions, etc. Anna also submitted the news that she (Anna) was a featured sing<T in a 
most popular night club (in New York) which Sarah Glover, with her famous personality, had madi- a howling sin-ei-(.s 
("rather a far cry from the Altar Guild," sighed Tiny). Anna wrote for many of the girls there in New York who were 
too busy and it, seemed they were all successful. "Erm" and Virginia Norton had established The Blaekie Memorial 
Home fqr Disabled Canaries and West Pointer*, which was very flourishing. Olivia McKinnie had published a slim, 

expensive volume of verse entitled " " Sydney Curry was a mysteriously fascinating 

widow (Tiny heaved a sigh on reading this), the anonymous author of a successful play "The Hangover." Julia 
Gaillard and Jewel Sandlin, still inseparable, ran a darling little tearoom, "The Chocolate Drop," for men only. 
(Tiny said she imagined this was the result of their daily whispered consultation in Economics.) Anna's contribution 
ended with that, and {Catherine Duff's began. 

"I am very happy," she wrote, "down at Nags Head, in a little rose-covered cottage built for two. My husband and 
I run a genera] store and it's so much like the old times at school lean quite imagine myself a girl again." She enclosed 
a snapshot of some girl— "an eld friend of yours," she had written on the back, and Tiny and I both shrieked "Polly 
Harris" and it was— "the nub." That physique was unchanged and that prufile was vaunted to the skies. She's a 
Coles Phillips model now and nationally known — ("All those famous exercises of hers which shook Feeble Senior Hall 
on its foundations are justified," murmured Tiny.) Kack said that Phoebe and Piatt had danced before the crowned 
heads of Europe, were world renowned, and had their pictures in all the society magazines. (Tiny remarked that she'd 
seen their "famous dancing feet" in Blue Jay Ads, but I'm sure that was envy pure and simple.) 

Bay Dunn, the class Joker and the most remarkable pianist possible, wrote that she was on Keith's circuit and 
played Raleigh often. ("I take the children to the matinee every time she comes," Tiny said. "She's always the head- 
liner and the children cry for more.") 

Julia Brent Hicks informed the class that she had married and settled down (she always was the most sensible girl 
in the class) and has twins, red topped little boys. She added that Leslie Ritter, famous tight-rope dancer of Barnum 
A Bailey is under the rare of Mayo Brothers as a result of a fall she had when her lover, mad with despair at her in- 
difference, tripped her at her afternoon performance. 

"Little Em" Hallyburton had entered as a novice in Creve Coeur Convent wheic Billy Hiatt, for whom we had 
prophesied a brillant success on the stage, was Mother Superior! Julia Brent did not know positively, but she understood 
that their withdrawal from the world was occasioned by the same trouble — "a three letter word meaning the stronger 
sex," "Judy" added subtly. Little Em was spending her time drawing posters of a rosy cheeked young man for the 
Woodbury Soap Company. 

Sarah Falkener did not write this time. Tiny said she was at Reno trying to get a divorce before the opening season 
of Leap Year. "Sarah wanted the best of everything and she said she wasn't going to be satisfied until she'd found the 
ideal man, but I have Him," Tiny remarked complacently. 

Pattie Smith, one of the highest high-kickers in the Russian ballet, wrote gleefully that she was now Pavlowa's under- 
study and apparently high up the ladder of fame. 

Jackie wrote briefly that her little John was entering un "that dangerous second summer" and that she was forced to 
stay with him entirely. ("Jackie always was thorough," Tiny recalled, "Remember she even used to make out her 
laundry lists.") 

Susanne Tucker, always artful, is wno a well-known illustrator with a fond attachment for Huxley and Darwin 
after office hours. ("She hasn't changed," said Tiny, "she always loved those men, though 1 used to think she carried 
them about just to make an impression.") 

"Hoggie," her beauty untouched by years, wired Tiny that at the opening night of "Let the Men Pay" in which she 
starred, that the seats were 5100, (AND THE MEN PAID— the house was packed!). 

Little old Ree Garrett, our most versatile Senior, cabled from abroad that she had attracted nation-wide attention 
in her Senior year by her remarkable executive ability, and the Secretary of the Treasury asked her to see what she 
could do about collecting the foreign debt. "It's mere child's play after collecting for "Virginia Jets," Ree is reported 
as telling the press representatives who interviewed her in London. 

"I know we must have seemed ordinary, everyday, girls to the faoulty and our superiors, (if they existed)," Tiny 
remarked thoughtfully, "but did it never occur to you to wonder what kind Fate it was that gathered all that talent 
and versatility and mentality in one class? Personally I think it was a miracle." 



Fifty 




SARA FAULKENER (tPATTI* SMITH 
MOST BRILLIANT 

'£ ** 










aOSEPHlME BATTLE 
MOST UKELY TO MARRY 



Senior Statistics 



Fifty-on c 



i£>otig of tfje Mentors; 

TKSLIE is the frankest gal, 

Polly is our collitcli "nub," 
Hoggie's the best all round pal, 
Johnson's the athletic dub. 

Anna runs the Altar Guild, 
Pattie grinds the Annual staff, 
Norton works to keep that build, 
Teeny jokes and makes us laugh. 

E. Piatt heads the student mob, 
Phoebe steers the Seniors true, 
Billy tells the Sigma Lambdas, 
Just exactly what to do. 

Duff upholds the Business side, 
But she and Agee socialize. 
All in all the seniors are 
Mighty clever, mighty wise. 



Fifty-two 




Friends of the Seniors 



Fifty-three 



pab ^ream of a Mentor 

CIR LAWRENCE HARDING, who was old Sir JOHN's SON, had just seated himself at his dinner. 
^ A PLATTer of HALLIBURT ON toast was put before him, to be followed later by plum-DUFF. 
He dined in regal style, in the company of his daughter who was dressed with many a GAILLARD of 
lace on her best bib and TUCKER. But for all their airs, the family had not long lived that way. The 
great-grand-father of this man had been a GLOVER; then his grandfather became a FALKENER to 
the king so lie could always keep the leather gloves on hand for hunting. (Echo answers — on whose 
hand?) This man had fought In a decisive BATTLE and had DUNN a great many noble deeds for 
which lie was knighted and given a home in a grove of stately oak trees by A GEE-ographical surmise 
somewhere in tiie south. As Sir LAWRENCE vulgarly put it, this raised them to the HARRIS-tocracy. 
Yet he still had a burgher spirit. 

As he sat lost in thought — (compare the bitter brooding thought of Jean Valjean in "La Chute") 
many reminders came to him of the dark deeds his poor but noble neighbors had committed on his 
property. They thought that birth could condone everything (cf. Falkland in "Caleb Williams"); 
that a high name in a GARRETT was better than great riches; yet they did not hesitate to steal from 
him at will in a HOGGARD-ly way because he would not CURRY favor with them — a huge door 
swung silently open on its hinges, creaking with age AND RUS-t (according to the most Gothic element 
in the early English novel). At the same time a picture swung loose from its hangings (Le vent had 
probably souffle a little but he did not know it). 

With an indefinable feeling of impending trouble the baron saw his SMITH arrive. The man was 
sHI ATT first, as shown by his nervouS ANDLINg of his hat, and afraid to tell his news (this is 
only a mediaeval device, however, to prolong suspense) but he finally yielded to his master's impatience 
and stammered forth his news. 

The baron gave a great sNORT ON hearing it and raised his hands in wrath. 

'"EVINS," he said, "I knew it; they will ruin me; they will destroy my trade; they will kill me — ." 

"What is it, father?" quieried the rather insipid daughter. 

"MCKINNE hen," he groaned in despair. "They have taken my best guinea hen and the nine 
best cHICKS!" 

Author's note: The name BOHANNON has been omitted. It simply would not aid in the develop- 
ment of the plot action. In pace requiescat. 



Fifty-four 




Seniors as They Might Have Been 



Fifty -five 



Hament 



A NNA says there ain't no use 
■*• *■ In buying soap. 
No matter how low a brand she'd choose 
She gave up hope 

Of ever getting some that wouldn't meet 

The public favour. 
Every kind — acrid or sweet 

Had worlds of savour. 

To everybody on the hall 

Her taste seemed perfect and to fill 
The exact needs to each and all, 

But Anna said "now ain't that sil." 

"I can't afford, in spite of love, 
To keep this whole hall clean, 

And if I don't keep some on hand 
The girls will say I'm mean." 

Polly wants some "what will remove 

All smears of good ole pore cream," 

Billy wants some that will prove 
Swell to wash her sox in. 

Anna says its downright funny 

What becomes of soap. 
The poor girl, one time so sunny 

Has begun to mope. 

The mystery's deep, and much involved; 

It gives the whole hall pain; 
And yet we wish it could be solved 

So we could wash again. 



Fifty-six 




Fifty-seven 



* 




ftp 



Margaret Cameron 
President 



Sara Redding 
Vice President 



Freda Webb 
Secretary- Treasurer 



Colors: Purple and Lavender 



junior Class; 



Motto: Aim high but reach highe, 



Flower: Violet 



Class Officers; 

Margaret Cameron President 

Sara Redding Vice President 

Freda Webb Secretary- Treasurer 

Miss Ruef Junior Adviser 



£*>titbent Council Jttembenf 

Marcaret Cameron Elizabeth Tiiorxberry 

Virginia Taylor 



Fifty-eight 



Evelyn Beacham 
Dublin, Ga. 



Emily Wood Badham 
Edenton, N. C. 



Julia Texie Boggess 
Del Rio, Texas 



Florence Ellis Bowers 
Washington, N. C. 



Mary Grist Bowers 
Washington, N. C. 



Mary Marshall Briggs 
Raleigh, N. C. 



Margaret Cameron 
Coronado, Calif. 



Isabelle Redding Clarke 
Waycross, Ga. 



Margaret Louise Davenport 
Rocky Mount, N. C. 




Fifty-nine 







Nannie Alice Crowdek 
Henderson, N. C. 



F.LI.EN EDMONDSON EsKRIDGE 

Raleigh, N. C. 



Florence Earle Farnum 
Newport, R. I. 



Louise Elizabeth Farme 
Raleigh, N. C. 



Lucy Carter Freeze 
Hendersonville, X. C. 



Kate Parks Kitchii* 
Scotland Neck, X. C. 



Lucy Floyd 
Oxford, \. C. 



Martha Lanier 
Chattanooga, X. C. 



Eleanor Hubaro 

LvnclibiirL', \ a. 



Sixty 



Ellen Porter Lewis 
Birmingham, Ala. 



Mary Angie Luther 

Beaufort, N. C. 



Margaret Green 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



Janice Harbort 
Wavnesville, N. C. 



Margaret Harrington 
Raleigh, N. C. 



Charlotte Hill 

Norfolk, Va. 



Frances Jordan 
Weldon. N*. C. 



Marguerite Maunde 
Dublin, Ga. 



Mary Perrin Neville 
Meridian, Miss. 




Sixty-one 




Frances Virginia Newman 
Farmville, Va. 



Emily Dewey Mitchell 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 



Helen Kale 
Lexington, N. C. 

Edith Delzelle Pasteur 
Ocala, Fla. 






Sara Elizabeth Redding 
Waycross, Ga. 

Margaret Scott Runnion 
Raleigh, N. C. 



Mary Elizabeth Smith 
Goldsboro, N. C. 



Helen Suppler Stein 
Batavia, N. Y. 



Meta Devereux Stockard 
Wilmington, N. C. 

Dorothy Stryker 
Orange, N. J. 



VsJLib" 



Sixty-two 



Emily Hayes Sumner 
Raleigh, N. C. 

Virginia Taylor 
Bronxville, X. Y. 



Annie Andrews Thomas 
Henderson, N. C. 



Endoka Elizabeth Thomas 
Richmond, Va. 



Annette Reveley Tucker 
Raleigh, X. C. 

Caroline E. Tucker 
Raleigh N. C. 



Freda Towers Webb 
Hillsboro, N. C. 



Mary Laurence Withers 
Raleigh, N. C. 



Cornelia Battle Wits ell 
Little Rock, Ark. 



Mary Badham Wood 
Edenton, N. C. 




Sixty-three 




JuNIOKS 



Sixty-four 




Conditional Juniors 



Austix 




Leggett 


Patterson 


Brigham 




Foster 


Richardson 


Bryant^ 




1* It E EM AN 


Roper 


Byrd 




C!l LKEY 


Tate 


Camerox 


VJ. 


Gorham 


Thornberry 


CoOPER 




1 loDGES 


Tucker, C. 


Craver 




I fa WELL 


Turner 


Drank 




Jordan 


Underbill 


Duncan 




Montgomery 


Wool worth 


Jenkins 




Parker 


Taliaferro 



$ iffy -five 



Headman 

Traveling Salesman. 



n n 

Motto: / want to be answered*. 

Password: You heard mel 



fflzmbzv& 



Babe Glove 

Bebe Isa 

Betty Li la 
Eleanor 



Mable 

Mattsy 

Phibbie 



Platt 
Sally 
Tarry 

Tucker 



Miss Sutton 
Froffy 




©&* ft. a. &. 



Kale 

Patterson 
Neville 



W'eathersby 
Richardson 
Gilkey 



llappa i&afetp 

President We have none 

Vice President Doesn't "rate' 1 

Secretary ....Just for "fun" 

Treasurer We all hate 

Motto: Kappa Safety in time 
Holds 'em fine 

illembersf 

Bowers Victrola Freeze Sell and Buy 

Brown Shinola Hay Get or Die 

BURCKMEYER LONG HAIR StILWELL < HALL ZOO 

Collins Underwear F.Webb Michty True 

Duffy Hats S. Webb Natural Curl 

Floyd Cats Honorary Smart Girl 



Sixty-six 




•liscty-seven' 






I 



y 



<■ 



y 



^7v 







g>opfjomore Class 

Colors: Ebony and Gold Flower: Black-eyed Susan 

Motto: Climb tlm the rocks be rugged 

Class (Dftitcrs 

Makg aret Fox President . 

Betty Comer rice President 

Eleanor Gibson Secretary-Treasurer 

Miss Bohannon ..Class Adviser 

Student Council Members 
Margaret Fox Eleanor Gibson 

Class ftoll 

Alfred Dobbin Lewis. M. H. Powell 

Barham Eaton Lonon Steele 

Beacham Fairlev Lynch Tarry 

Blackburn Fox Lyon Thomason 

Brett Gibson McGwigan Yaughax 

Burckmyer Hay McRae Walter 

Capehart Hazell Mason Weathersby 

Clarke, E. Hook Mathews, E.- Webb, E. 

Cleve Howell Mathews. L. Wicgs 

Comer Kelly Mathieson Williams, M. 

Cummins Lee Patterson Willis 

Dickerson _ Lewis, M. B. Pitt Wilson, G. 

WlNBORNE 






hi 






-, 



Sixty-eight 




Sixty-nine 



<■> 



) , 



. 




jfresfjman Class 

Colors: Red and Gray Flower: Red Rose 

ClatfS €>ttktv& 

Shirley Noble President 

Frances Hamilton Vice President 

Polly Howard Secretary-Treasurer 

Miss Bason Class Adviser 

Student Council Member 
Shirley Noble 

Clasf* Roll 

Ames Davis, M. P. Houtz Mancum 

Boesch Fairfax Hutchinson Noble 

Brick ey Fin lay Jeffress Park 

Brown Glines Lassiter Van Sickler 

Carroll Hamilton Lawrence Slade 

Curtis Hardy MacMillan . Verner 

Davis, D. Howard Madara Warren 
Wat kins 



St r< iih/ 




Seventy-one 




Preps 



Colors: Pink and Blue 
Motto: Children should be seen and not heard 

Clasfsi (©tttcers 

Frances Haigh President 

Theodora Cameron Vice President 

Elizabeth Collins _■_ .Secretary-Treasurer 

Miss Roberts Class Adviser 



Anderson 

Arthur 

Baily 

Brown, M. P. 

Cameron, T. 

Collins 

Elliot 

Glenn 

Haigh 

Hardin 

Hoyt 

Irby 

Juhan 



Wilson, D. 



Lindsey 

Lynah 

McGill 

MacRae 

Manning, M. 

OTarrell 

sh.ewmake 

Shore 

Stilwell 

Storr 

Underwood, A. 

Underwood, E. 

Webb, S. 



Seventy-two 



<$fc*NK47#J($ 




Seventy-tfirec 




Seventy-four 




Seventy-five 




bulletin &tatt 

Harriet Garrett i Editor-in-Chief 

Texie Boggess Assistant Editor 

Shirley Noble _ Assistant Editor 

Margaret Fox_ Assistant Editor 

Jacquelin Drane ._ .. .Literary Editor 

Nannie Crowder School Sews Editor 

Emily Wood Bad ham Society Editor 

Elizabeth Mason - Typis 



Seventy-six 




^PanHrcfjon Council 

Elizabeth Plait President of Student Body 

Phcebe Harding Senior President 

Margaret Cameron Junior President 

Margaret Fox Sophomore President 

Shirley Noble Freshman President 

Frances Haigh :_.. Prep. President 

Pattie Smith Editor-in-Chief of the Annual 

Katherine Duff Business Manager of the Annual 

Sarah Falkener E. A. P. President 

Krma Williams Sigma Lambda President 

Mattie Sue Taylor Sigma President 

Virginia Taylor Mu President 

Harriet Garrett _ _ Editor-in-Chief the Bulletin 

Texie Bogcess President 'of the Church School Service League 

Anna Bohannon President of A bar Guild 

Josephine Battle President of College Club 

Leora Hi att President of Dramatic Club 



Seventy-seven 




&ltar <^uilb 

Anna Bohannon President 

J. Texie Boggess Vice President 

Miss Roberts First Supervisor 

Miss Bason Second Supervisor 

ffltmbeva 



Andhus, H. 


Glover, S. 


Pitt, M. B. 


Battle, J. 


Hardinc, P. 


Platt, E. 


Boggess, J- 


Hamilton, F. 


Ritter, L. 


Barham, S. 


Hoyt, B. 


SUBLETT, N. 


Bohannon, A. 


Johnson, E. 


Taylor, V. 


Cameron, M. 


McKinne, 0. 


Vaughn, R. 


Drane, J. 


Norton, V. 


Webb, E. 


Duff, K. 


Patterson, R. 


Webb, F. 


Garrett, H. 




Williams, E 



Seventy-eight 




Cfjotr iHembcrsi 

Mr. Jones Director and Organist 

Miss Trigg Assistant Organist 

Miss Fielding 1 Leading Soprano 

Miss Houchen Leading Alto 

Elizabeth Webb Crucifer 



Andrus 


GlLKEY 




Patterson 


BOHANNON 


Glines 




Platt 


Cameron, M. 


Houtz 




Shore, F. 


Comer 


Howard 




Thomas, A. 


Duff 


Kelly 




Thorn berry 


Eaton 


Madara 




Vaughn 


Fairfax 


Mathieson 

McKlNNE 


M. 


Wilson, D. 



Seventy-nine 




SPARE MIHUTE5 ^^^ 



A Day at Saint Mary's 



Eighty 




Eighty-one 



Cpstlon glpfja $t 



Colors: Green and Gold 



Flower: Jonquil 



Motto: Esse Quam Videri 



©fftcersf 

Sara Falkener President 

Josephine Battle Vice President 

Texie Boggess Secretary 

Helen Andrus Treasurer 

Miss Cook___ Faculty Adviser 



jlflembers 



Agbe, E. 


Fabnum 


Mathieson 


Anderson 


Floyd 


McKinne 


Andrus 


Garrett 


McGwigan 


Arthur 


Gibson 


Mitchell 


Austin 


Gilkey 


MpNTGQMERY 


Badham 


Glenn 


Newman 


Beach am, E. 


Hallybubton 


O'Fabrell 


Beacham, F. 


Harding 


Park 


Boesch 


Hodges 


Parker 


Boggess 


Hook 


Pitt 


Bowers, F. 


Houtz 


Platt 


Blackburn 


Howabd 


Powell 


Bbiggs, M. 


Hoyt 


Raney 


B big ham 


Hubabd 


Ritter 


Brown, M. 


Irby 


Slade 


Bbown, M, F. 


Jeffbess 


Stockard 


BUHCKMYER 


Jenkins 


Taylor, M. S. 


Cameron, T. 


Johnson, E. 


Taliaferro 


Clarke, J. E. 


Kale 


Thomas, A. A. 


Clarke, I. 


Kelly 


Thobnberry 


Cleve 


Kitchin 


Tucker, A. 


COOPEB 


Lee 


Tucker, C. 


Crow deb 


Lewis, E. 


Under hill 


Cummins 


Lewis, M. H. 


Underwood, A. L. 


Davis, D. 


Lonon 


Underwood, E. 


Dickebson 


Luther 


Vaughan 


Duff 


Lynch 


Warren 


Dunn, E. S. 


Madara 


Weathersby 


Dunn, M. 


Mason, E. 


Williams, M. 


Eaton 


Manoum 


Willis 


Elliot 


Manning 


Wilson, D. 


Fair ley 


Mathews, E. 


Wilson, G. 


Falkener 




Wits ell 



Eighty-two 



• 1 sS 

• V 

■ i 




■ ' 



Eighty-three 




jWarafjate 



Elizabeth Smith, Chief.. 

Emily Wood Badham E. A. P. 

Jeanette Gilkey E. A. P. 



Sigma Lambda 

Margaret Cameron. -Sigma Lambda 
Sara Redding. Sigma Lambda 



m*B*d*Z*&- 




3fnter=i£>octetP debaters 

Query: Resolved, That the Monroe Doctrine should be continued 
as a part of the foreign policy of the United States. 



Affirmative 

Emily Wood Badham E. A. P. 

Julia Texie Boggess E. A. P. 



Negative 

Virginia TXylor Sigma Lambda 

Frances Jordan Sigma Lambda 



Eighty-four 



3ln ffltmovv of William Cnos g>tone 

(Winning poem in Inter-society Contest) 

'VT'OU would be first to bid us not to mourn, 

You'd chide when our unbidden tears would fall, 
And tell us that, although our hearts are torn, 
Our grief, when shared, is not a grief at all. 
Still lives the fragrance of the withered flow'r; 
Long glows the mellowed light from vanished sun; 
So is it now with us in this sad hour, 
Your mem'ry — for we loved you — every one. 
Your love for us, like brightly burning star 
That brighter grows with coming of the dawn, 
Shall shed a benediction from afar, 
A blessing that shall follow on and on. 

Mary Theresa Lawrence, Sigma Lambda 



Eighty-five 



{Rje Hegenb of tfje g>an Jfeltpe Springs; 

By 
Julia Texie Boggess, E. A. P. 

"Madre de Dios, but ha rides thee hard, ehiquito! And yet, even carried by thy swift legs, he does not return till 
dawn. Ah! look at thy hoofs! Pobrecito, surely these rocks and hills are not to thy liking. Indeed, 'tis a foolhardy 
errand that takes him out. each night even at the risk of exposing our retreat. Oh well, we must remember, little one, 
that he is in love and forgive his weakness." 

These murmered condolences came from a young man who was quickly unsaddling a tired buckskin mustang. 
He solicitously massaged the stiff muscles of the pony's legs before taking him to water at the river bank. After turning 
him into the crude little pen with the other mounts, the young man, Miguel, strolled leisurely toward the spot where 
the recent rider of the mustang lay relaxed on a blanket. As ho stood looking down at the lean dark face of the man 
already sleeping soundly, his eyes softened and he smiled faintly. 

"El Capitan is indeed in love, poor fellow. He is a truecaballero and she a beautiful maiden, but what folly! What 
can come of it? Well, 'tis of his own doing. Of these nightly meetings there can be few more, for soon we must move 
our camp south along el Rio Grande." 

In the shadow of several tall pecan trees which grew beside the cool little river, a small group of men was gathered 
to eat the meager breakfast they themselves had prepared. It was a rough looking company, but beneath the soft 
beards were youthful faces, none of them having as yet seen thirty years. They had the fine dark eyes and graceful 
carriage of the true Spaniard, unusual in a country thinly inhabited by Indians and a few half-breed peons. All were 
dressed in soft worn suits of leather that conformed closely to their slender, erect bodies. The young men, who were 
sitting in carelessly comfortable positions, were quietly discussing El Capitan, Felipe de Valero, as Miguel approached. 

"He did not return till dawn this time," volunteered the usually laconic Pablo. 

"The buckskin's feet arc getting tender," from Carlos. 

"I fear our Felipe is scarcely prudent," said Ricardo. 

Hot-headed young Toniosprang to his feet, "Have care, Ricardo, while El Capitan is sleeping, do not say what 
you would not were he awake and listening!" 

"Calm yourself, Tonio inio," returned the impassive Ricardo, "gladly would I say those very words to Felipe, and, 
before the day is over, such is my intention. I shall also tell him that he is very unwise as well as imprudent, for love 
and war are a sad combination," 

"Ah, you are cold hearted, Ricardo," exclaimed Tonio, quickly defensive, "It is wonderful to be in love on days 
such as these, and with such a girl— Caramba! but she is a beauty!" 

"Silence, Tonio!" commanded Ramon, who sat a little apart from the others, "Ricardo is right; love and war are a 
sad, infinitely sad, combination," He turned his head away and even Tonio was quiet through sympathy, for all 
knew how Ramon had torn himself away from his young wife to join the rebel, Hidalgo. Then after weeks of fighting 
for the liberation of Mexico, he had returned to find that a Spanish army had destroyed the village leaving no trace of 
her whereabouts. 

"Never fear, compadres," said Miguel breaking the silence, "Felipe will not let his heart sway him in his purpose. 
He is steadfast. Was it not for that we chose him as our leader?" 

"You are right, Miguel," agreed Carlos, "when word comes from Morelos, Felipe will not hesitate. If the summons 
would only come! I am impatient with dawdling away time in this hole, beautiful though it be! Oh, if we could hut 
be fighting with Allende and Hidalgo! Di6s mio, they were men! Had not those dogs of Indians deserted there at 
Guanajato, they would be at the capital now defying Spain, instead of resting their last rest at the foot of some 
scaffold!" 

"I too am restless in this cowardly retreat, Carlos," said Pablo. "I cannot sleep peacefully until I have avenged 
my father who died in poverty. Those cursed obras pias (Benevolent funds) robbed him of every peso and the later 
forced land sale confiscated our very home and lands. Christo, but I would like to feel the throat of the man who made 
that law!" 

"My father was trod underfoot by the horse of a Spanish general, because he refused to adn it the black-hearted 
scoundrel to our home! I must I ive to see him die!" cried Jose, the youngest of the troop. He was only a boy of sixteen, 
but his whole body was trembling with the intensity of his desire for vengeance. 

"If only we can regain at Cuatla what was lost with the capture of Allende and the sainted Hidalgo! Compadres, 
we must, we must!" exclaimed the ardent Tonio. 



Eighty-six 



"I hope the summons does not come while our esteemed captain is on one of his nocturnal visits," said Ricardo, 
"Our orders were to leave within the hour." 

" 'Twould not matter," explained Miguel, "for I have instructions to superintend the immediate breaking of camp 
and have authority to call a forced march south in such a circumstance. The march would take us near the largest 
of the three great springs where Felipe meets his Dolores. Our young friend, Jose, would then offer to ride ahead and 
call Felipe that our little company might be complete. Have no fear, Ricardo; Felipe knows how to use that handsome 
head he carries on his shoulders." 

"Mille gracias, Miguel, for that vote of confidence," pleasantly said El Capitan, who had quietly joined the group. 
He bent to pour himself some coffee and straightened to face his comrades. As he stood there tousled and unshaven, 
he seemed charged with an unseen force and a queer light shone in his dark eyes. He spoke without emotion. "My 
friends, you were kind enough to choose me as your capitan on the day before the terrible defeat when we lost Miguel's 
brother, Enrique. That day I took an oath that I would never fail you, but would do always what seemed to me right 
and best. I know that you, Pablo, were not satisfied to retreat into this desolate country even after our great leaders 
were executed, but we were so few we could not have prevailed against the Spanish troops. Our best chance was to hide 
from the officials who were like to seek out all able-bodied young men who were not in the king's uniform. Few though 
we are, they fear us, for men such as we have proved ourselves to be are not easily discouraged from a task to which 
they set themselves. We must bide our time here beyond the reach of prying individuals and wait until our new great 
general, Morelos, can gather forces and be in need of us. Alone we could do little, but combined with others we may 
yet win our liberty! 

"It is also easy to see that some of you do not look favorably upon my nightly visits to the big spring where I meet 
the seiiorita Dolores. I can understand your disapproval and am sorry for it. I realize that my actions are not of the 
wisest, but, men, believe me when I say that no one but Dolores knows of my coming and going. She takes the utmost 
precautions to see that no one marks her absences. 

"Since I am your chosen Captain, I cannot see that it is necessary for me to explain my actions. But you are my 
friends, some of whom do not even desire an explanation, and you, I think, are entitled to one. Tonight I shall tell 
my Dolores goodby, but as soon as this war is over, I am coming back to her and we are going to have a home near 
that wonderful spring where we first met!" he ended passionately. 

Felipe gulped down the coffee, tossed the cup aside, and sank to the ground beside Miguel who placed an under- 
standing hand on his shoulder. When the weary captain dropped back to rest face downward on the grass, Miguel 
watched him affectionately. Had not this boy been as a brother to him and the lost Enrique? And now since Enrique's 
death Felipe was all the more dear to the older man. God grant that he might yet see the boy happy with Dolores as 
his wife. 

Tonio's eyes were shining with admiration as he regarded this captain who was his ideal of manly conduct. Of course 
he was blameless. Por Di6s, who could doubt a man such as he? Had Ricardo seen the fearless challenge in his eyes 
while he spoke to them? By heavens, he would follow that fellow wherever he chose to lead. 

He leaned over to touch Jose and said to him in an undertone, "My boy, grow up like our captain and you will be 
a real man." 

"Si, Tonio," replied the boy, "I don't believe I would be far from right." 

Before night fell Felipe had saddled the buckskin pony and was ready to make the usual ride to his trysting place. 
After mounting the horse, he rode close to the camp and called to his friends, "Men, the time draws near and should a 
messenger come while I am gone, waste no time. March south, send for me, and I will join you. Miguel is always in 
command during my absence, Adios!" 

Abruptly turning his horse, he trotted briskly away until the figure of horse and rider became indistinguishable 
amid the sagebrush and cactus. 

In central Mexico, before the young rebels led by Felipe de Valero had even had time to pitch camp on el Rio del 
Diablo, General Ycr mo of the Spanish army summoned from the ranks one Manuel Ortego, a half-breed Indian who had 
voluntarily enlisted with the Spaniards. 

When Ortego appeared Yermo acknowledged him with a nod, glared harshly at him, and finally snapped, "You are 
from that part of this cursed country called Coahnila?" 
"SI, sefior," answered the uneasy man. 
"You know the country well?" 
"Sf, seBor." 

"Would you undertake a dangerous task for one hundred pesos?" 
"Sf, sf, sefior," this more eagerly. 

"Very well, listen carefully. There is a troop of Spanish rebels, traitors to their blood and country, who have with- 
drawn up el Rio Grande toward the pueblo of La Loma de la Cruz. You must follow and locate them, and kill, if 
possible, the most dangerous, Felipe de Valero, who is the captain. If you cannot, return to me immediately after you 
have located them. If you kill the captain, I will reward you with one hundred and fifty pesos." 

An hour later saw Manuel Ortego journeying northward with a full description of Felipe de Valero in his pocket. 

Nestled at the foot of a peculiarly round and symmetrical hill was the quiet pueblo of La Loma de la Cruz, so 

named because of the large wooden cross firmly planted on the, hill top. The central building of the village was the 



Eighty-seven 



small 'dobe mission which was the pride and joy of Father Fernandez, who saw in it the fulfillment of his dreams. 
It was he who had built the cross and converted the Indians of the village. With their help the buildings of the mis- 
sion had been constructed of the sun-baked brick, adobe. Alone he had brought the Word of God to this wasteland 
and made it a living example of His greatness. As a companion in this voluntary exile from those of his own kind, 
the good padre had his orphaned niece, Dolores. 

She had been but a thin, scrawny child of fourteen when she had first endured the many hardships side by side with 
her loved uncle. The passing years had softened the lines of the olive cheek and full red mouth. The fearless grey eyes 
were wider and the wild black hair had been tamed to be in keeping with the new womanliness she had attained. With 
all her growth and development, however, she had not lost a particle of that venturous courage which had so marked 
the child who years before had refused to be left behind while her uncle journeyed into a new country fraught with new 
experiences. She was adored by the village Indians and was comparatively happy helping her uncle in his kindly works. 
She was not discontented, but deep within her there was a vague undefined desire for something different. The distant 
mountains were promises while the great deep spring, whose water combined with those of two lesser springs to make 
the little river which flowed past the village of La Loma de la Cruz, was a symbol of her unswerving devotion to her 
uncle and her interest in the monotonous village life. 

Dolores often spent the hot hours of the afternoon lying in the shade of the willow trees which bordered the banks 
of this distinctively beautiful spring. It was so large that forty men with arms outstretched could scarcely have en- 
circled it and no one knew how deep it was. She loved to gaze at the eerie caverns which, when the sun sank to a cer- 
tain angle, she could see far back in the cool green depths. The moss and other water plants stretched their tendrils 
waveringly upward and seemed to be hardly strong enough to resist the eternal tugging of the icy water as it bubbled 
up from some unknown source. In spite of the appaient force of this upward flow, there was a peculiarity about the 
spring which often delighted Dolores. She could toss a fairly heavy log of wood into the water and watch it — not float 
away, but sink slowly out of sight as if it were grasped by mysterious hands from below. 

The hot, dull days passed slowly until one day a single event changed Dolores' life from a monotonously peaceful 
existence into a remarkable adventure. She was unbelievably happy, and yet, she could confide the cause of her hap- 
piness to no one without betraying the trust that was beginning to mean more than life to her. No one in the village 
knew of the young Spaniard whom she had surprised kneeling to drink at the brink of her spring one afternoon. Ah, 
she could laugh yet to remember how startled he had been to see her standing there. And no one would ever know, for 
he had explained to her that, for him and his friends camped a few miles away, life or death depended on how well the 
secret should be kept. No one, not even Father Fernandez, knew that each night after dusk had fallen and the village 
was asleep, Dolores crept from her room and slipped along the dim path to the spring, there to meet and talk for per- 
haps an hour with her new friend. 

It was not long before love took the place of friendship, for Felipe was young and impetuous and she was strongly 
attracted to this dashing leader of a rebel band. The entire color of Dolores' life was changed by this wonderful and 
(to her) new emotion. She could endure the long days only because of the prospect of the few stolen moments to be 
spent with Felipe in the evenings. She was also intensely conscious of the secret she was guarding, and her fits of ab- 
straction puzzled her uncle more than once. 

She had no real apprehensions, however, until Manuel Ortego, a one-time resident of the village, came swaggering 
back from the wars. He dazzled the natives with lurid tales of his bravery and annoyed Dolores with the amorous 
glances he soon began to cast in her direction. She had no reason to believe her fears justified, until one evening she 
almost encountered him at the edge of the town as she was starting down the narrow path leading to the spring. Ter- 
rified, she sped back to her room, but she knew she had been seen and feared the questions he might ask. 

She would have been frantic indeed had she known that Ortego, prompted by curiosity when he saw pursuit to be 
useless, had sought out the indistinct path down which her feet had been directed. He followed it warily and, warned 
by the stamping of horses hoofs, stopped before he burst through the screen of willows into the sight of the impatient 
young man standing beside the horse. Astonished and nonplussed Manuel crouched in hiding until Felipe, worried and 
tired of the useless wait, mounted and rode away. 

Manuel, who was not noted for the keenness of his wit, was frankly puzzled. Contrary to Dolores' expectations 
however, the next day he made no mention of the incident of the night before. Instead, with native caution, he hid 
the next evening near the spring in an attempt to solve the mystery to his satisfaction. He was scarcely settled in his 
niding place whenDolores came hurrying twoard the spring. She stood with hands nervously clasping and unclasping 
to await her lover. She did not have long to wait, for soon the sound of horses' feet announced his coming. When he 
pushed through the dense underbrush and saw Dolores standing there, he quickly dismounted and rushed eagerly 
forward to catch her in his arms. After a long kiss he slightly loosened his hold and started to question her as to the 
reason for her absence the preceding night. Before his words were formulated Dolores burst into a flood of explanation 
and warning. She begged him to forgive her blundering and bade him leave at once. Felipe was a little startled by 
this turn of events, but he only held her more closely and attempted to quiet her.fears. At last, to please her, he con- 
sented to leave only on the condition that she would meet him there the following night for a last farewell. 

Crouched nearby Ortego watched Felipe reluctantly tell Dolores goodby. He had been able to hear only a few 
of the words that had passed between the two, but he had heard the girl call the man Felipe. Suddenly Ortego s dull 
wits quickened. Felipe! why that was the name of the rebel leader whom he sought. Then surely this must be he. 



Eighty-eight 



Remarkable that be had stumbled across him so quickly. This was excellent, the rest was easy and soon he would be 
richer by one hundred and fifty pesos. Now he would return to his hut and whet his dagger that it might slip in more 
easily. 

It was a downcast captain who urged his horse forward through the gathering dusk so that he could have a few 
more precious moments with Dolores. It was the last time they would meet for months, and, unless God was very good, 
perhaps the last time they would meet on earth. Felipe had no illusions concerning the dangers he was soon to face 
with Morelos, and it was only with the greatest optimism that he could imagine himself surviving them unscathed. 
But tonight was tonight and he would make the most of it. He pushed his horse into a gallop in order to cover more 
quickly the short distance between him and the meeting place. He dropped the reins over the horse's neaci, dismounted, 
and ran to (he hank of the spring. Expectantly he glanced around, but Dolores was not yet there. Wearied by riding 
and suspense, he seated himself on the ground and gazed into the spring, the surface of which was transparent silver 
in the moonlight. 

The same moonli gut shone on the polished blade of the knife before it sank into Felipe's unsuspecting back. Without 
sound or struggle, he fell forward lifeless. \\ ith a grunt of satisfaction Ortegu pulled out Ids knife, wiped it on tne grass, 
and slipped it under his belt. He bent over t he limp form and with much effort picked it up. He carried it to the edge 
of the spring and with a mighty heave pitched the body in the water. Some one was hurrying up the path, so he van- 
ished into the shadows. 

As Dolores pushed through the willows, she saw Felipe's horse, but could not see the master. Her eyes happened 
to fall on the rippling surface of the spring. What was that moving in it? She rushed to the edge and stared down into 
the white face of her lover as he was gently pulled by unseen hands to his strange grave. 

Wild with despair Dolores screamed and sank to her knees. With arms outstretched she called over and over, 
"Felipe, Felipe! Do not leave me, vida de mi alma! Come back, come back, mi cielo. Felipe! Felipe, mio!" 

Some say that she became half mad, and it is certain that she was among the first to die when small-pox wiped out 
all of the village save the few who fled. These living retold the tale and awesomely declared that still at night the spirit 
of Dolores returned to the spring and called, "Come back, come back, mi vida! Felipe, Felipe, mio!" 

Henee the name Felipe became permanently connected with the spring. The story lost nothing in the retelling as 
it passed from lip to lip and the further title "San" meaning "saint" was attached to it, for to the superstitious peons 
anything mystic and obscure is regarded with awe and called holy. Today the San Felipe springs flow on amid more 
peaceful surroundings, but this old tale of war and love and sorrow will not be forgotten as long as Felipe's name re- 
mains as a reminder. 



Eighty-nine 



i£>tgma Hamfc&a 



Colors: Purple and Gray 



Flower: Yellow ]a 



Motto: Lit With the Sun 



Erma Elizabeth Williams President 

Leora Hiatt hce President 

Betty Ervvin Comer Secretary 

Margaret Fox Treasurer 

Miss Agee V.WWfaculty Adviser 



Alfred 

Ames 

Bailey 

Barham 

Bohannon 

Bowers, M, 

Brickev, W 

Britt 

Byrd 

Comer 

Capehart 

Carlton 

Carroll 

Collins 

C raver 

Ccrtis 

Davenport 

Dav.s 

Dobbin 

Drane 

Duncan 

Evins 

Fairfax 

Finlay 

Fox 

Freeze 

Glines 

G or ham 



Jftlemiertf 



Green, M. E, 

Haiqh 

Hamilton 

Harsort 

Hardin, C. 

Hardy 

Harris 

Hart 

Hay 

Hiatt 

Hicks 

Hill 

HoQtlARD 

Howell 

Hutchinson 

Jordan 

JUHAN 

Lanier 
Lass iter 
Lawrence, M 
Lawrence, V. 
Leogett 
Lewis 
Lindsey 
MacMillan 
MacRae, M. 
McRae, J. W. 
Mathewes, E 
Nevile 



Noble 

Norton 

Pasteur 

Patterson 

Reddino 

Richardson 

Roper 

Shewmake 

Shore 

Smith, E. 

Smith, P. 

Stein 

Stryker 

Sub lett 

Tarry 

Tate 

Taylor. V. 

Thomas. E. 

Thomason 

Turner 

Van Sickler 

Verner 

Walter 

Webb, E. 

Webb, F. 

Win borne 

Woolworth 



Ninety 




Ninety-one 



tEfje Utterarp ^octettes 

TN 1900 Miss Imogen Stone organized two literary societies at Saint Mary's. 
-*- These maintain a spirit of friendly rivalry in frequently arranged contests. 

The Epsilon Alpha Pi Society was named in honor of Edgar Allan Poe. The 
Sigma Lambda Society was named for Sidney Lanier. Since their formation, these 
groups have met separately every other Tuesday night, alternately in the parlor 
and the study-hall. They meet, too, on special occasions such as Founders Day. 

The contests arranged include the submitting of original poems, essays and 
short stories to competent judges; a model meeting judged by the originality and 
execution of its program and business; and an annual debate. Each of these 
contests contributes points toward a cup given to the society winning the highest 
total of points. The societies also have the privilege of choosing two marshals each 
for auditorium exercises and for commencement. They alternate in choosing the 
Chief Marshal for the following year. This privilege fell to the Sigma Lambda's in 
1928. 

The final debate taking place this year was the twenty-fifth annual contest as 
inter-society debates have been held only since 1903. 



Ninety-two 



CLUBS 



i ■ M 




Ninety-three 




Bramattc Club 



Leora Hiatt President 



fflzmbex* 



Ames 


Fairfax 


Lewis 


Andrus 


Falkener 


Montgomery 


Austin 


Floyd 


Xoble 


Barham 


Garrett 


Norton 


Boesch 


Glines 


Rag land 


BOGGESS 


Hi ait 


Richardson 


Cameron, M. 


Howard 


Thomas, E. 


Crowder 


Lanier 


\V ATKINS 


Duff 


Lawrence, M. 


Webb, S. 


Elliot 




\\ OOLWORTH 



Ninety-four 




mn Club 



Miss Fielding __ 










Miss Nicholson 








Accompanist 


Barham 


Hay 




Mathieson 




Bohannon 


Hazell 




Mitchell 




BOESCH 


Hicks 




Norton 




Bryant 


Houtz 




Pasteur 




Cameron, M. 


Howard 




Pitt 




Cleve 


Hoyt 




Platt 




Crowder 


Hutchinson 


Shewmake 




Davis 


Jordan 




Shore 




Dunn, M. 


Kelly 




Stein 




Eaton 


Lawrence, 


M. 


Taliaferro 




Eskridge 


Lindsey 




Thomas, A. 




Galloway 


Lonon 




Vaughan 




Glines 


McGwigan 




Williams 




Hamilton 


Mangum 




Willis 




Harbort 


Math ewes 




Winborne 




Harrington 


Lawrence, 


V. 


Woolworth 





Ninety-five 







. 



College Club 



Josephine Battle President 

Leora Hi att Vice President 

Elizabeth Johnson Secretary 

Margaret Harris Treasurer 

ill ember si 



Ames 


Gorham 


Mathews, I,. 


Arthur 


Green 


Mitchell 


Austin 


H ally burton 


Montgomery 


Badham 


Hamilton 


Nevile 


Barham 


Harbort 


Newman 


Boesch 


Harding 


■ Parker 


Bowers, F. 


Harris 


Powell 


Bowers, M. 


Hay 


Redding 


Brickey 


Hiatt 


Richardson 


Brown, M. 


Hodges 


Slade 


Carlton 


Hogward 


Smith, E. 


Clarke, I. 


Hoyt 


Smith, P. 


Clark, E. 


HUBARD 


Stein 


Cleve 


Jeffress 


Stryker 


Crowder 


Jenkins 


Taliaferro 


Cummins 


Johnson 


Tate 


Davenport 


Jordan 


Thomas, E. 


Drane, J. 


Kale 


Thomas, A. 


Duncan 


Kitchin 


, Warren- 


Dunn, M. 


Lanier 


Wilson 


Dunn, E. S. 


Leggett 


Williams, E. 


Evins 


Lewis, M. 


Williams, M. 


F air ley 


Lewis, P. 


Willis 


Falkener 


McRae 


Winborne 


Floyd 


MANtjITM 


Wits ell 


Garrett 


Mathews, E. 


Underhill 



Ninety-six 



' .'■ 




>feetct) Cluti 



Eleanor Gibson President 

Theodora .Cameron Secretary-Treasurer 



jfflembtr* 



Cameron, T, 


Hubard 


Cleve 


SlCKLER 


F IN" LAY 


Stock ard 


Gibson 


\YeATHERSB\ 



Lynch 



Ninety-seven 



I s 



^ 





<§ratt0&augf)terg anb #reat (granbbaugfjterfii 
of &atnt Jflarp's; 



Elizabeth Webb 

Emma Stevenson Dunn, 



. President 
_ Secretary 



Jessamine Austin, Monroe, N. C. 

daughter of 

Allie Welsh, Monroe, N. C. 

Emily Wood Badham, Edenton, N. C. 

granddaughter of 

Sarah Paxton, Edenton, N. C. 

Josephine Battle, Rocky Mount, N. C. 

granddaughter of 

Pattie Battle, Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Mary Dorothea Brigham, Blacksburg, Va. 

daughter of 

Lusie Wood, Aiken, S. C. 

Margaret Cameron, Coronado, Cal. 

daughter of 
Theodora Marshall, Raleigh, N. C. 

granddaughter of 
Margaret Haywood, Raleigh, N. C. 



Theodora M. Cameron, Coronado, Cal. 

daughter of 
Theodora Marshall, Raleigh, X. C. 

granddaughter of 
Margaret Haywood, Raleigh, X. C. 

Sue Martin Capehart, Avoca, X. C. 

granddaughter of 

Mary Martin Capehart, Avoca, X". C. 

Nannie Alice Crowder, Henderson, N. C. 

daughter of 
Ethel Seabrook Dorsey, Henderson, N. C. 

Mary Pettway Davis, Warrenton, X. C. 

great granddaughter of 

Elizabeth Price, Raleigh, X. C. 

Jaquelin Prince Drane, Charlotte, N. C. 

daughter of 

Florence Thomas, Charlotte, X. C. 



TPinety-eig'ht 



Emma Stevenson Dunn, New Bern, N. C. 

daughter of 

Emma Stevenson, New Bern, N. C. 

Virginia Elliot, Chapel Hill, N. C. 

daughter of 

Dora McRae, Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Rachel 0. Glenn, Mexico City 

granddaughter of 

Mary Brodnax, Greensboro, N. C. 

Phcebe Randolph Harding, Washington, N. C. 

granddaughter of 

Elizabeth Hughes, Beaufort County 

Frances Hamilton, Baltimore, Md. 

granddaughter of 

Frances Gray de Roulhac, Hillsboro, N. C. 

Lilian C. Hook, Augusta, Ga. 

daughter of 
Caroline Clark, Augusta, Ga. 

Della Hassell Jeffress, Kinston, N. C 

granddaughter of 

Ida Lanier, Williams ton, N. C 

Mary Lawrence, Lumberton, N. C 

daughter of 
Emma Norwood, Waynesville, N. C 

Virginia Lawrence, Lumberton, N. C 

daughter of 

Emma Norwood, Waynesville, N. C. 

Betsy Lee, Fremont, N. C. 

granddaughter of 

Jane Cuttar, San Francisco, Cal. 



Patty Battle Lewis, Oxford, N. C. 

granddaughter of 
Lizzie Manning, Chapel Hill, N. C. 

granddaughter of 
Nellie Battle, Chapel Hill, N. C. 

great granddaughter of 
Patty Battle, Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Jane MacMillan, Wilmington, N. C. 

great granddaughter of 

Jane Iredell Meares, Wilmington, N. C. 

Josephine Patton Parker, Asheville, N. C. 

granddaughter of 

Martha Belle Turner, Salisbury, N. C. 

Annie Andrews Thomas, Henderson, N. C. 

granddaughter of 
Annie Swepson Andrews, Henderson, N. C" 

Mary Wood, Edenton, N. C. 

daughter of 

Elizabeth Badham, Edenton, N. C. 

granddaughter of 

Sara Paxton, Edenton, N. C. 

Sophronia Winston Webb, Durham, N. C. 

daughter of 

Gertrude Winston, Durham, N. C. 

granddaughter of 

Sophronia Horner, Durham, N. C. 

granddaughter of 

Alice Hill, Hillsboro, N. C. 

Pattie Sherwood Smith, Summerville, N. J. 

daughter of 

Emily Higgs, Raleigh, N. C. 

granddaughter of 

Louise C. Hill, Scotland Neck, N. C. 



Ninety-nine 



Wbt ^t.Jflarp'g of tfje Sixties; 

A Letter Written by the Great- Aunt of 
a Student here nozv 



Dear Aunt Margaret 



St. Mart's School, Raleigh, 
Saturday, January 25th, 1*<i'> 



Supposing you would like to know something about my school, I will write and tell you. I expect you 
have seen Tommie before this. I am delighted with Dr. Smedes, and think it is an exerlent school, but I am dreadfully 
homesick. To-day is the first day I have passed since I left home that wag at all happy. Yesterday I was more un- 
happy than, I think, I ever was before in my life. I thought I never would be happy again. I will tell you how we pass 
our time. We get up at half past six and have prayers at 7 1 : >, then breakfast and then we walk an hour, after that we 
study an hour then have chapel service, then we recite our Bible lesson and a part of Cowpera Task, and after that 1 
recite Evcrdencos of Christianity and Mental Philosophy then paint an hour and study an hour and then comes dinner; 
after which I recite French an hour then Algebra then we walk sometime then practice till supper; after that we .study 
an hour; and have prayers and go to bed at nine o'clock. To-day we had chapil service before breakfast and we have 
all of the rest of the day to ourselves except form ten till twelve when we are obliged to sew. 

Saturday night — All the girls are dancing in the parlor. The parlor is very large. I think it has a thousand square 
feet, there is no carpet on the floor and the girls stay in there whenever they want to and dance. The study room is 
the same size, on the other side of the hall; where we have desks and study and wiite. The parlor walls are covered 
with fine paintings. 

I like the dormatory arrangements very much. There is a partition about S feet high on each side of the room, and 
each side is divided by the same kind of pattition into five little rooms with a door and a curtain before the door, they 
arc called alcoves and two girls dress in each, there is two closits, two basins and pitchers and two of everything in each. 
The beds are outside and every girl has a single one they are the hardest things I ever laid on. 

We have very good eating, have turkey -Sunday and cake for supper. You must be sure to come with Mother and 
Aunt Charlotte when they come for me in June. I dont know how I will live seventeen weeks more as I have this last 
one, but I expect we will not be so homesick after we get used to everything. A teacher stays in each dormatory and the 
one in ours is as cross as she can be and a great deal more strict than any of the others. She does not let us speak one 
word after we go in at night until we come out in the morning. Lillie and I have the same alcove. I feel towards Dr. 
Smedes as if I had known him all my life. All the girls love him; we all go to him for everything and he makes it easy 
and pleasant; he always has some kind pleasant word to say to you when he meets you. 

Sunday morning — Miss Maggie and Miss Mary Shepard came and paid me a long visit yesterday afternoon. We are 
not allowed to go out except on the second Saturday in every month. We have a beautiful little chapil on the lot and 
all the girls go without bonnets; it looked very strange to me last Sunday. There is an organ in the Chapil and the 
music is very sweet. I have written four letters home and have only got one yet. 1 think they might write to me twice 
a week. We have a very large beautiful grove with gravel walks to walk about on. Last week the weather was dread- 
ful; I suppose that helped to make me misrable; but the sun came out bright yesterday and although it is cold it is very 
pleasant. 

I expect you were very much surprised when you heard such as thing as my coining here was thought of. I dont. 
know what made me think I wanted to come; for nothing in the world will ever get me back here after June. It is the 
pleasantrst school I ever knew of but still nothing like home. Please write to me sometimes. I thought Aunt Lizzie 
would disapprove of my coming but Mother wrote me word she did not. I feel so happy every night to think one more 
day is gone. 1 have to write to Tommie to-day so I will have to stop. 

Give my love to Uncle Thomas, Aunt Lizzie, Charlie and the children and believe me 

Your affectionate niece 

Fannie 
Direct your letters to St. Mary's School Raleigh 



One Hundred 




ATHLETICS 




One Hundred One 



g>tgmaa 1927=1928 

Colors: Red and White 



Elizabeth Thornberry President 

Caroline E. Tucker Vice President 

Eleanor Gibson Secretary-Treasurer 

Ellen Agee Manager of Basketball 

Elizabeth Platt ■ Manager of Volleyball 

Harriet Garrett Manager of Track 

Polly Howard Manager of Swimming 

Caroline Tucker Manager of Tennis 

Caroline Tucker i Cheer Leader 

Margaret Cameron Cheer Leader 



Miss Alexander 
Miss Holt 
Mias Davis 



Jfacultp jfflem&ers 

Miss Bohannon 
Mrs, Mabbiott 
Miss Shapcott 
Miss Nicholson 



Miss Reuf 
Madame Simbolotti 
Miss Fielding 



aeu>n 



Agee, E. 


Green, M. 


Newman, F. 


Anderson, M. 


Haigh, F. 


Norton, V. 


Bailey, J. 


Harbort, J. 


O'Farrell, R. 


Blackburn, M. 


Hardin, C. E. 


Parker, J. 


Boesch, B. 


Hardin, M. 


Pitt, M. 


Boggess, T. 


Hardin, D. 


Platt, E. 


Bowers, F. 


Harding, P. 


Powell, M, 


Bowers, M. 


Hardy, H. 


Raney, K. 


Bhicket, W. 


Harris, M. 


Redding, S. 


Briggs, M 


Hay, H. 


Richardson, S. 


Brioham, M. 


Hazell, N. 


Ritter, L. 


Britt, E. 


Hiatt, L. 


Rogers, E. V. 


Brodghton, M. 


Hill, C. 


Rogers, M. E. 


Brown, M. F. 


Hodoes, C. 


Roper, N. 


Bdhckmyer, V. 


Hook, L. 


Sandlin, I. 


Byrd, L. 


Howard, J. 


Shewmake, L. 


Cameron, M. 


Howell, C. 


Shore, F. 


Cameron, T. 


Hoyt, B. 


Stilwell, M. 


Capehart, S. 


Irby, K. 


Storr, M. 


Carroll, E. 


Jenkins, M. 


Sub lett, N. 


Clarke, J. E. 


Kale, H. 


Tabby, F. 


Coffey, M. 


KlTCHIN, K. 


Thomas, A. A. 


Chowder, N. 


Lassiteh, E. 


Thomas, E. E. 


Curry, S. 


Lawrence, M. 


Thobnberry, E. 


Curtis, C. 


Lawrence, V. 


Tucker, C. E. 


Dickerson, E. 


Lee, B. 


Tucker, S. 


Duncan, C. 


Lonon, L. 


Tucker, C. 


Evins, S. 


Lutheb, M. A. 


Undebhill, R. 


Fairley, A. 


Lynah, M. 


Underwood, A. L. 


Farmer, L. 


Lynch, M. 


Underwood, E. M. 


Farnum, F. 


MacRae, M. 


Van Sickleb, D. 


Foster, H. 


Madara, M. 


Vebneb, P. 


Fox, M. 


Mancum, A. 


Weathersby, H. 


Gaillard, J. 


Mathews, E. 


Wig as, L. 


Garrett, H. 


Mathews, L. 


Williams, E. E. 


Gibson, E. 


Maunde, M. 


Wilson, G. 


Gilkey, C. J. 


Meekins, A. 


• Withers, M. 


Glenn, R. 


Montgomery, M. 


Witsell, C. 


G lines, V. 


McGill, A. 


Wood, M. 


Glover, S. 


Neville, M. 


Woolworth, E. 



One Hundred Two 




One Hundred Three. 



JflttS 1927=1928 



Colors: Blue and While 



Virginia Taylor President 

Elizabeth Hogcard Vice President 

AIabel Tate Secretary-Treasurer 

Frances Hamilton Manager of Swimming 

Mabel Tate Manager of Track 

Betty Comer Manager of Basketball 

Jacqueline Drake Manager of Volleyball 

Katherine Duff Cheer Leader 

Marguerite Williams Cheer Leader 

Lucile Slade Cheer Leader 



Jfacultp jfflembetg 



Miss Cooke 

Miss Lee 

Miss McKimmon 



Miss Sutton 
Mr. Jones 
Dr. Bacot 



Miss Roberts 
Miss Agee 
Miss Hohn 



moii 



Alfred, M. 
Ames, A. 
Andrus, H. 
Authur, J. 
Austin, J. 
Badham, E. 
Barham, S. 
Battle, J. 
Beacham, E. 
Beacham, F. 

BOHANNON, A. 
Brown, M. 
Bryant, E. 
Carlton, S. 
Clarke, E. 
Cleve, F. 
Collins, E. 
Comer, B. 
Cooper, E. 
Crayer, L. 
Cummins, E. 
Davenport, L 
Davis, D. 
Davis, M. 
Dobbin, E. 
Drane, J. 
Duff, C. 
Dunn, E. 
Eaton, R. 
Elliot, V. 
Eskhidge, E. 
Fairfax, H. 
Falkener, S. 



Finlay, E. 
Floyd, L. 
Freeman, B. 
Freeze, C. 
Gorham, M. 
Hallyburton, E 
Hamilton, F. 
Harrington, M. 
Hart, V. 
Hicks, J. B. 
hoggard, e. 
Houtz, .1. 

Hl'DAHD, E. 

Hutchinson, E. 
Jeffress, D. 
Johnson, E. 
Jordan, F. 
Juhan, F, 
Kelly, H. 
Lanier, M. 
Leggett, M. 
Lewis, E. 
Lewis, M. 
Lindsay, M. L. 
Lyon, V. 
McMillan, J. 
McGwigan, R. 
McKinne, O. 
McRae, J. W. 
Mathieson. M. 
Mitchell, E. D. 
Noble, s. 



Parks, J. 
Pasteur, D. 
Patterson, R. 
Pippen, M. P. 
Runnion, M. 
Slade, L. 
Smith, E. 
Smith, P. 
Steele, N. 
Stein, H. 
Stockard, M. 
Stryker, D. 
Sumner, E. 
Taliaferro, M. 
Tate, M. 
Taylor, V. 
Thomason, D. 
Tucker, A. 
Tucker, C. 
Turner, V. 
Vaughan, R. 
Walter, B. 
Warren, B. 
We&b, E. 
Webb, F. 
Webb, S. 
Williams, M. 
Willis, V. 
Wilson, D. 
Winuorne, A. P 
Watkin.5, L. 
Manning, M. 
Duffy, C. 



One Hundred Four 




One Hundred Fivr 




lYYVJ* 



letter Club 

Elizabeth Hoggard President 

Elizabeth Thorn berry Vice President 

Mabel Tate Secretary-Treasurer 

Jflember* 

Bohannon Norton* 

Comer Platt 

Drane Ritter 

Hamilton Tate 

Hoggard Thorn berry 

Hoyt Tucker, C. E. 

Montgomery Williams, E. 
Williams, M. 



One Hundred Six 




ngma pasfeetball 



Stilwell 

RlTTER 



First Tean 
Brigham 

Norton 



Crowd er 
Tucker, C. 




JWu Pagfeetball 



Tucker, A., Capt. 
Hoggard 



First Team 

Finlay 

Slade 



Brown, M. 
Hamilton 



One Hundred Seven 




Evins 

Pi. ATT 



^>tgma Uollep Pall 

First Team 
Williams Garrett 

Briggs Hoyt 




Hog card 
Tucker, A. 



ifflu "Wolltv Pall 

First Tea m 
Hamilton Slade 

Fairfax Drane 






r* 



Tate 
Taylor, V. 



One Hundred Eight 




dTrack (Eeams 





SIGMAS 




MUS 


A GEL, 




Lee 


Ames Slade 


Brigham 




LoNON 


Cummins Taylor, V. 


Brickey 




Luther 


Drane Tucker, A. 


Garrett 




Montgomery 


Fairfax Williams, M 




Kale 




Hamilton Wilson, D 
Hog card 



One Hundred Nine 




Swimming 




Tennis 



One Hundred Ten 




Mu and Sigma Officers 



One Hundred Eleven 



I 1 ' ^..^Sttftflrfw' '*ZL_>-1W>£ M-&* ^ 




Track Stars 



One Hundred Twelve 




One Hundred Thirteen 



1928 grtattsttcs 



Most Representative ) 

Most Influential > Miss Elizabeth Platt 

Most Versatile ) 

Most Attractive Miss Margaret Cameron 

Most Popular ' Miss Virginia Taylor 

Most Original Miss Elizabeth Johnson 

Most Graceful Miss Margaret Montgomery 

Most Athletic Miss Elizabeth Hoggard 



One Hundred Fourteen 




Most Representative 

Most Influential 

Most Versatile 



One Hundred Fifteen 







Most Attractive 



One Hundred Sixteen 




Most Popular 



One Hundred Seventeen 




Most Original 



One Hundred Eighteen 




Most Graceful 



One Hundred Nineteen 




Most Athletic 



One Hundred Twenty 




May Queen 



One Hundred Twenty-one 




Maids of Honor 



One Hundred Twenty-livo 



' 




p It? 




texie sqsgess 
euz.ho06arp "repris6mtatjvb' 



PQU.Y HOWARD 

"ArmAenve** 




Seconds in Statistics 



Ow e Hundred Twen I y-three 



0n Statistics; 



OCHOOL statistics are quite apt 

To make girls quite vain 
And make them get so very wrapt 

Lip in themselves a "pain" 
Is synonymous with each 

Of them who is elected 
To grace the pages of this book 

And amongst those selected 
Appear as representative 

Of some desired charm. 
So we repeat such things as this 

Are often bad — more harm 
Than good resulting from 

This sudden rise to fame. 
But let us just suggest (to some) 

That no decided claim 
To charm or anything be made 

Unless each girl retains in one 
All the virtues here displayed; 

Accomplishes what these girls have done. 



One Hundred Twenty-four 




One Hundred Twenty-five 




m 


PHfcT 




We look in former annuals 

And 'tis so sad to see 
The witty things those S'rs said 

They weren't a bit like me. 

They were bright and they were clever 
And it hurts us so to look 

We bet they now are editors 
Of the very best joke book. 

Our E. -in-chief, she bawls at us, 

"Where is your Sr. wit, 
You know you say some clever things 

You dumbbells! Out with it!!" 

Yes, we know we must say funny things 
Of course we do, ahem, 

\\ hat made us laugh in class so hard? 
It must have been a gem. 

Bay's a jolly joker 

Tine, an entertaining gink 
But when we come to write their cracks 

My gracious! I can't think! 

If you've seen our jokes before 
Don't start a wicked rumor 

It's all between us girls, my dears, 

And the leaves of College Humor. 





Ove Hundred Twenty-six 




SUNDAY WALKS 



THANKSGIVING 



GIVING 

■ : 



Fall Activities 



Owe Hundred Twenty- seven 







£$jr3te>:*:' 




Latin Club Pictures 



Owe Hundred Twenty-eight 







^abe ©ou i>earb==? 



-BUT- 



"We might say the young girl is beautiful, 

"Girls, don't bother about your big hips, you have the feminine build, 1 ' 

"Dear, Mr. Way wouldn't approve of it." 

"Now, honey, I don't' know about that." 

"You will come to the Latin Club meeting tomorrow, won't you?" 

"EVERY ONE LOOK AT ME." 

"I'm sorry young leddies, but I am in charge of this class." 

"Turn to page 215 shut the window stop rattling paper turn your minds to the lesson and don't 
ever think Business English is easy." 

"Golf is my only relief from the daily grind." 



Mr. Stone: What food stuffs does the United States export? 
Bay Dunn: Corn, wheat and tobacco. 

Miss Lineberry: Watch the board carefully while I go through it again. 



One Hundred Twcnty-nim 



$oofe Htst 



The Green Hat Miss Davis 

The Little Minister Bishop Penick 

The Story of My Life Mrs. Fripp 

The Virginian Miss Terrill 

The Trysting Place The Little Store 

The Lil'est Lover Bill (see Julia Brent) 

We Miss Bohannon and Polly 

The Man Without a Country Dr. Bacot 

Barren Ground Bible Class 

Saint and Sinner Roger and Evelyn 

Foolish Fiction Study-hall Regulations 

Origin of the Species Chapel Caps 

Paradise Lost Extra Day at Spring Holidays 

The Sky Pilot Babe Taylor 

The Perennial Bachelor Mr. Jones 



Dr. Bacot: What would you do in Raleigh today if all the gasoline and rubber supply were taken 
away? 

E. Johnson : Get on the street car. 



Miss Ruef: What is the opposite of "before-going" 
Bay Dunn (as usual): "Before coming." 



Meg Williams (In Chemistry exam.): To make sulphuric acid you have to burn pirates (Pyrites) 
and use the dust from them. 



Economics exam. An artist is an example of monopoly because he is a soul producer. 

Miss Ruef (Mid year review): These notes are a half of the term work you have finished. 
S. F.: What's the other half? 

Dr. Hunter: The conquest of China has taken place during my lifetime. 
H. Andrus: Yes, sir — during the last century. 



One Hundred Thirty 






•V.vl 






• * 



)?.7s ^- :■■ - *g8?* 




Colonial Ball 



One Hundred Thirty-one 




May Day 1"27 



One Hundred Thirty-two 



King's Servant: Sir, there is a lady without. 

King: Without what? 

K. S.: Without food and clothing. 

King: Oh! then feed her and bring her in. 

Miss Cook: What do you think of Keats's technique? 

Sally Redding: Oh! it does right well, but I like Doc's better. 



I 
Out by the wooden summer house, 
The fearless watchman stands. 
His business is to guard the school 
And place strong iron bands 

II 

Across the driveway when the cars 
Come up to school with boys, 
When on each Sunday afternoon 
The powers decree no noise. 



Ill 
He eyes each passing errant male 
Who looks in at our school, 
For looking at Saint A'lary's girls 
Breaks grave tradition's rule. 

IV 

He grins when all the boys wave hard; 
But when some pining lass 
Begs for them to come in the grounds, 
He says— "THEY SHALL NOT PASS!" 




One Hundred Thirty-three 



Monday- 


12. 


Tuesday 


13. 


Wednesday 


14. 


Thursday 


15. 


Saturday 


17. 


Thursday 


22. 


Saturday 


24. 


Monday 


3. 


Saturday 


8. 


Wednesday 


12. 


Saturday 


15. 


Wednesday 


19. 


Wednesday 


26. 


Thursday 


27. 


Friday 


28. 


Monday 


31. 


Tuesday 


1. 


Wednesday 


2. 


Thursday 


3. 


Friday 


4. 


Friday 


11. 


Monday 


14. 


Wednesday 


16. 


Monday 


21. 


Wednesday 


23. 


Thursday 


24. 


Tuesday 


29. 


Thursday 


1. 


Saturday 


3. 


Monday 


5. 


Tuesday 


6. 


Wednesday 


7. 


Thursday 


8. 


Saturday 


10. 


Wednesday 


14. 


Thursday 


15. 


Friday 


16. 


Saturday 


17. 


Monday 


19. 


Wednesday 


21. 


Thursday 


5. 


Friday 


13. 


Thursday 


19. 


Tuesday 


24. 


Thursday 


26. 


Tuesday 


31. 



Calenbar of €bents 

SEPTEMBER 
New Faculty assemble. 
New Students register. 
Old Students register. 
Advent Term opens. 
New-Girl — Old-Girl party. 
Dr. Mims lecture 5:30. 
Literary Societies' reception. 

OCTOBER 

Mojica concert. 

Bloomer party. 

Faculty and Rector at home. 

Class parties. 

Mr. Duncan at Assembly. 

Mr. Capps at Assembly. 

Reception to Faculty. 

College Club tea 5:00. 

Expression recital 5:00. 

Halloween party. 

NOVEMBER 

All Saints, Founders' Day. 

Mr. Tucker speaks at Assembly. 

Miss Slater's lecture 8:15 p.m. 

Students recital. 

Rev. James B. Turner Armistice Day speaker. 

Track Meet. 

Mr. Tucker at Assembly. 

Mr. Jones Recital (Christ Church). 

Mrs. Covington speaks at Auditorium. 

Thanksgiving Day. 

Reception to Juniors. 

DECEMBER 
Domestic Science tea to Facultv. 
Volleyball (1 and 2). 
Volleyball (1 and 2). 
Civic Music Association. 
Mme. Simbolotti at Assembly. 
Marion Talley. 

Model Meeting of Literary Societies, 
Carolina Glee Club. 
Private expression plays. 
Dr. Floyd H. Black 7:15 p.m. 
Students' recital., 
Christmas party. 
Glee Club concert. 
Christmas Recess begins. 



Students report. 
Prof. Bernard 8:15 p.m. 
Reception to Sophomores. 
Mid year Exams, begin. 
Miss Ruef's tea to Juniors. 
Easter Term begins. 



JANUARY 



One Hundred Thirty-four 



FEBRUARY 



Friday- 
Saturday 

Monday 
Saturday 
Thursday 

Friday 
Tuesday 
Wednesday 
Saturday 



Saturday 
Saturday 
Thursday 
Tuesday 

Saturday 



3. 
10. 
15. 

20. 



Gladys Swarthout. 
Civic Music Association. 
Basketball (First team). 
Latin Club. 
Dean Hibbard (night). 
Basketball (First and second). 
Mr. Jones' Lecture. 
Reception to Fresh and Preps. 
King's Henchman. 
Colonial Ball. 
Ash Wednesday. 
Basketball (Second team). 



Basketball (second team) 
Basketball (third team). 
Spring Recess begins. 
Students report. 
Civic Concert. 
Basketball (third team). 



Monday 


2. 


Basketball (third team). 


Friday 


6. 


Good Friday. 


Sunday 


8. 


Easter Day. 


Saturday 


14. 


Senior vaudeville. 


Saturday 


21. 


Literary Societies' debate. 


Monday 


30. 


Swimming meet. 


Monday 


7. 


May Day. 


Saturday 


12. 


Alumnae Day. 


Monday 


14. 


Glee Club concert. 


Sunday 


27. 


Commencement begins. 


Tuesday 


29. 


School closes. 



MARCH 



APRIL 



MAY 



One Hundred Thirty-five 



gcfenotolebgment 



T)esides the Annual Staff which has worked faithfully and loyally in puttingout 
-*-' this book, there is an unofficial staff which has worked no less earnestly for its 
production. Of these, Mr. Way has given needed sanctions; Miss Albertson 
special permissions for staff work; Mr. Tucker, invaluable business advice. Miss 
Sutton has given liberal advice and help. Without Mrs. Marriott the Little Store 
could not have existed. Miss Houchen arranged the large pictures. Miss Holt 
especially has aided materially by her helpful criticism of the copy taken to her 
at all hours. 

For student service, the staff is indebted to Miss Eleanor Gibson for the old 
English printing used on the four large Division Pages; to Miss Theodora Cameron 
for the reproduction of the Medallion on the outside cover; to Miss Suzanne Tucker 
for two subtitle pages; all of whom worked under the art supervision of Miss 
Hohn; and to Miss Virginia Lawrence, the Editor's roommate, for sympathetic 
encouragement in Annual work. 

Outside the school the Edwards-Cain drug store and Boon-Iseley's drug store 
have rendered swift and efficient snapshot service. We can not emphasize too 
much our gratitude to Mr. Horton and his associates of Horton's Studio for their 
help and cooperation in all the photography; and to Mr. Beck of Edwards & 
Broughton, the engravers, for his guidance and assistance throughout the entire 
book. Finally, the subscription of the advertisers was the basis of the business 
support. 

Thus, to the faculty, certain students, Raleigh business organizations and to 
the school at large who have helped in building the 1928 Stage Coach, the Staff is 
grateful. 



ftne Hundred Thirty-six 



TAYLOR'S 

"The Show Place of the Carolinas" 



COSTUMES DRESSES COATS FURS 

UNDERWEAR SPORTSWEAR FLOWERS 

JEWELRY HOSIERY BAGS 

NOVELTIES MILLINERY 

GIFTS ETC. 



Just, a real good store, a store that 
enjoys serving you better 



TAYLOR'S 



We Are for 
SAINT MARY'S 
Edwards-Cain Drug Co. 

Two Squares from the Campus 



THE ■ 


HUDSON-BELK COMPANY 


Raleigh, N. C. 


Is One of the Capital 


City's Most Popular 


Shopping Places. 


HATS 


COATS 


SUITS 


DRESSES 


EVENING DRESSES 


LINGERIE T7 v , • , , 
HOSIERY The Fashionable 

CORSETS School Girl Will Find 


GLOVES Our Popular Prices Afford 


Her Large Savings on Her Apparel 


Your Patronage Invited 




Bell Phones 781-418419 


Fresh Every Hour 






RALEIGH FRENCH DRY 


\ "Wilson's Sandwiches 


CLEANING AND 


Are Delicious" 


DYEING COMPANY 




Main Office: 17 S. Wilmington Street 


Demand 


Plant: 414-416 Gale Street 


Wilson's Products 


RALEIGH, N. C. 


and you get the best 






Oldest and Largest 



GEO. MARSH CO. 

INCORPORATED 

Raleigh, N. C. 

WHOLESALE GROCERS 

He Sure lo Call for 

"BLOOMSBURY BRAND- 
CANNED VEGETABLES 



C. D. ARTHUR 

Established 1886 
Headquarters jor 

SEA FOOD OF ALL 
KINDS 

Stall No. 1, New City Market 

Terms: Cash 

Phone 255 Raleigh, N. C. 



W. L. BROGDEN COMPANY 

Wholesale Fruits and Fresh Vegetables 

We have a new, modern, ventilated Cold Storage and we 
supply Saint Mary's School with the very hest Fresh Fruits 
and Vegetables all through the School Term. 

Nothing is too good for Saint Mary's. 

We cordially invite the Faculty and any of the Students 
to visit our plant at any lime. 



409 to 115 West Martin Street 



DILLON SUPPLY COMPANY 

MILL SUPPLIES 

MACHINERY 

MODERN MACHINE SHOP 

Quality and Service Did It 
Phones 752 — 753 Raleigh, N. C. 




Fur your comfort and convenience have 
the house electrically equipped 

FIXTURES INSTALLATION 

WIRING CLOSE FIGURES 

Summers Electrical Co. 

112 W. Martin St. 
Phone No. 1958 Raleigh, N. C. 



Yarborough Hotel 

and 

Coffee Shop 

'Raleigh's Most Famous Hold" 

150 Rooms 

125 With Bath 



RALEIGH'S SMARTEST SHOP 



fE tLlSBBfe ) 



126 Fayetteville Street 



''ftiinuon'*' 



APPAREL OF INSTANT APPEAL 

All the elements that women of recognized discrimination 
appreciate are available in Ellisberg's Garments at no 
extra cost. 

SPORT — FORMAL — STREET ATTIRE 

We Specialize in Correct Wear for the College Girl 



Alderman & Co. 

We handle Only the Best 
in 

Candies 

Also 

National Biscuit Cakes 
Raleigh, N. C. 



HISTORY M! 

Mediaeval landlord: "Bye dear, 
I'm going out now to do a little 
serf riding." 



Mr. Way (Bible N) : What 
makes the world go round? 

Norton I just waking up I : Love, 
nothing but love. 



COLLEGE STUDENTS 

ARE ALWAYS WELCOME AT OUR STORE 

Leaders in All High-Grade Toilet Goods 
TRY US FIRST 

Agents for HOLLINGSWORTH FINE CANDIES 
Boon-Iseley Drug Company 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



BYNUM PRINTING COMPANY 

g:iiiiiiiiiiiic]iiiiiiiiiiii[iiiiiiiiiiiii[]|iiiiiimii[]iiiiiiiiiiii[]iiiiiiiiiiii[iiiiiiiiiing 

j Better Printing g 

?IMIIIIII!II[]III[IIIIIIIIC]IIIIIII!1I|I[]IIIIIIIIIIII[]IIIII!IIIIII[]IIIIIIIIIII|[][IIIIIIIIII|[" 

PHONE 692—693 RALEIGH, N. C. 



CONFIDENCE 



The young ladies of Saint Mary's who arc 
sensitive to quality appeal and those who in- 
stinctively buy where complete confidence may 
be placed are among our most welcome 
customers. 

It is ever the policy of this Company to con- 
tinue to merit such confidence by constant at- 
tention to the proper relation of tpiality and 
price. 



Boylan-Pearce Company 

"Maleigh's Shopping Center' 



FOR GRADUATION 

AN ARTISTIC GRAND 

OR ORTHOPHONIC VICTROLA 
Gi)ls That Are Never Forgotten 




We Present Leading Musical Instruments 

CORPORATION 

TtluMcal JiieAcfiandlic 

WHOLESALE "i RETAIL 

Raleigh. N. C. 




Richmond Meat 
Market 

L. Schwartz. Manager 
Dealer in 

CHOICE MEATS 
Sausage a Specialty 

City Market 

Raleigh. North Carolina 

P. 0. Box 354 



■BEAUTIFUL SHOES" 




<Mra<ssbuFger-M/ e j 



Herbert Rosenthal 

The Shoe Fitter 
129 Fayetteville St., Raleigh, N. C. 



Hotel Sir Walter 

Raleigh, N. C. 

240 Rooms 240 Baths 

Every Modern Convenience 

"Where the Parents and Girls are 
always welcome"' 

Griffin & Bland Hotel 
Company, Props. 



California Fruit Store 

"Caterers to Saint Mary's 
for 28 Years" 

Efficient Soda Fountain 

Service 

Modernly Equipped 

LUNCHEONETTE 

Delicious Home Made 

CANDIES 

Phone 36 
111 Favetteville Street 



RCA-Radiola 

MADE BY THE MAKERS OF RADIOTRONS 

EVERSHARP PENCILS, WATERMAN'S FOUNTAIN 

PENS. KODAKS AND SUPPLIES. ALBUMS. 

MEMORY BOOKS. POEMS. LOOSE 

LEAF BOOKS. STATIONERY 



"Besl of Service" 

JAMES E. THIEM 

Phone 135 Raleigh. N. C. 



BRANTLEY'S DRUG STORE 

The Place to Meet 1 our Friends 

AGENT FOR "ELIZABETH ARDEN" 

Our 

Sodas and Ice Creams 

Are Always Best 

Telephones 14 and 15 Raleigh, N. C. 



Styled for the College Girl — 

IN THE FOLLOWING MATERIALS 



While Satin Vamp 
Rosebud Quarter 
Dyed any color — 
All Black Satin 
All Silver Kid 
All Patent Leather 
2V. to 8 AAA-C 



Roscoe-Griffin Shoe Company 

120 Fayetteville Street Raleigh, N. C. 






The Bus is the Best 


Isaacs (to partner) : Vot a pity 
ve gave de bookkeeper a holiday — 
'is books is all right. 


Way to Travel 

— To — 




Durham, Chapel Hill. Greensboro, 
Rocky Mount, Wilson. Dunn, 
Fayetteville and inter- 
mediate points 
on the 

Carolina Coach Co. 

SYSTEM 


"See that little man over there? 
He's an etiquette teacher in a deaf- 
and-dumb school." 

"What are his duties?" 
"He teaches the pupils not to 
talk with their hands full." 




You can charter a bus- to go anywhere. 
For terms and bookings, apply General 
Office, 510 East Davie St., Raleigh. 


Compliments of 


T. H. BRIGGS & SONS, Inc. 


"Carolina's Oldest Wholesale and 


Retail Hardware House" 


RALEIGH, N. C. 


Established 1865 Phone No. 45 



SAFE DAIRY PRODUCTS 

"Pasteurized for Your Protection' 

PINE STATE CREAMERY COMPANY 

Phone 717—718 



HORTON'S STUDIO 



yjiiiiimiiui niiiciiiiii a iiiiioi i uiiiiiiiiiuiEij! 

The Very Best in | 

I PHOTOGRAPHY j 

^iuiiiiiiiiiiiii]iiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiii[]iiiiiiiiiiii[]iiiiiiiii>iiuiiiiiiiiiii 

Official Photographer 

for 

THE STAGE COACH 



WARREN'S TRANSFER 

Opposite Union Station 

AUTOMOBILES FOR HIRE 

Special Rates for Out-of-Town Trips 

301 West Martin Street 

Phone 538 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



When in Need of Anything 

ELECTRICAL 

Call to See Our Complete Line 

Demonstrations 
Gladly Made 

THOMPSON 

Electrical Co. 

132 Fayetteville Street 
Phone 370 



The Art Flower 
Shop, Inc. 

Flowers for All 
Occasions 

130 Fayetteville Street 

Phone 207 

We Wire Flowers Anywhere 



Exclusive but not Expensive 

Eliza B. Enniss 

Corset and Lingerie Shop 



GOWNS 

PAJAMAS 
GIRDLES 
HOSE 

BRASIERES 
TEDDIES 
SILK UNDERGARMENTS 

22 W. HargelL Slreet 



Miss Terrill: Virginia Elliott, 
what does the word "furlough" 
mean? 

Virginia. "Furlough" means "a 
mule." 

Miss Terrill : "A mule," why 
Virginia, what do you mean? 

Virginia: Wily Miss Terrill, I 
know that a "furlough" does mean 
"a mule" 'cause yesterday 1 saw a 
picture of a soldier riding a mule 
i\nd under the picture was, "Going 
Home on his Furlough." 




Raleigh's Foremost Apparel Shop 
for Women and Misses 

A store where you are assured of finding throughout the 
season a pleasing assortment of all that is new and worth 
while in Women's and Misses' Outer Garments. A store 
also with the reputation for courteous treatment, good 
service and fair prices. We respectfully request an in- 
spection of our merchandise and methods. 



UNIVERSALLY ACCEPTED 
AS THE BEST 




Whether it's a Curling Iron, Electric Grill, Percolator, or 
any of the numerous Electrical home needs, Universal Ap- 
pliances are known for their dependability. No other ap- 
pliance is more beautiful in design or constructed of more 
lasting material. Ask for the Best and you'll get a Universal. 



On Display in Any o) Our Stores 



CAROLINA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY 



"RALEIGH" A GOOD SHOPPING CENTER 

Where to Shop 

ALFRED WILLIAMS COMPANY 

Established 1867 

Is the outstanding store for your needs in approved Stationery. 
All the New Books, excellent display of Cards, Novelties. We 
are delighted to have you call. 

119 Fayelteville Street 
EASTMAN KODAKS AND SUPPLIES 



Raleigh's Exclusive 
Flower Shop 

Phone 1070 

Corsages. Boquels. Cut Flowers 

Pol Plants. Decorations 

Funeral Designs and Sprays 

J. J. Fallon Co., Inc. 

"We Grow the Flowers We Sell" 
203 Fayetteville Street 



Miss Holt: Just think, young 
ladies, what would have happened 
if Shakespeare had forgotten to 
write. Hamlet; if Milton had for- 
gotten to compose Paradise Lost; 
if Defoe had not written Robinson 
Crusoe — 

Polly Harris: Yes, just think. 
What a chance that would be for 



ROYSTER'S 

Fine 
Candies 

Almost as Old as 
Saint Mary's Itself 



Mr. Way: Would you care to 
join in the new missionary move- 
ment? 

C. Hardin: I'm crazy to try it. 
Is it anything like the Charleston? 

New Minister: Quite a lot of 
people had coughs during my ser- 
mon this morning. 

Old Deacon: Coughs? They 
ain't coughs, sir. Them's time 
signals. 



YOUR PATRONAGE APPRECIATED AT THE 



4S 



e 



Theaters 

'ALWAYS A GOOD SHOW 

SOMETIMES 

A GREAT SHOW" 



STAUDTVS 



AND 




BREAD AND CAKES 

STAUDT S BAKERY 

RALEIGH 4040 
RETAIL DEPARTMENT, 120 SOUTH SALISBURY STREET 



THE 
LADIES' SHOP 

FINE 
MILLINERY 

136 Fayetteville Street 
10 per cent off to School Girl 



.Molly B.: Did you give that 
goldfish any fresh water? 

Marianne: No, he h a dn ' t 
finished the water I gave him 
yesterday. 




M^ii^Afe —